The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 6, June

A R T S W A T C H: Death ... a Good Career Move?
Did an early visitation from the Grim Reaper unknowingly give artists like Patsy Cline, Janis Jopkin, and Chopin a boost in reputation? I was sitting in Memphis when the news of Princess Diana's death came through, and it got me wondering about...
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A R T: Treasures of the Pacific Northwest
ERIC P. OLSEN The Royal British Columbia Museum presents "the voice inside the mask" as a traditional Northwest Coast people come forward to tell their own story, as embodied in their art. Lumbering gray whales troll the pristine waters off Vancouver...
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A T T H E E D G E: The Wonder of It All
Most of the world's gas hydrate lies beneath hundreds of feet of deep-sea sediment. These deposits have probably remained relatively stable for hundreds of thousands of years. In parts of the Caspian Sea, the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the outer...
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B O O K S F R O M A B R O A D: In a Penal Colony
Return of an Exile: An Interview With Yvonne Vera Charles Larson: What was it that made you decide that you wanted to be a writer? And when was that? Yvonne Vera: This is the most precise of questions with the least precise answer. I never made...
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C O M M E N T A R Y: Kids Light a Candle for Human Freedom
Think ordinary people can't make a difference in world affairs? Colorado schoolchildren are buying Africans out of slavery. Teacher Barbara Vogel's fifth-graders in Highline Community School in Aurora, Colorado, had just finished learning about...
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C O M M E N T A R Y: Mayors to Washington: Hands off, Not HandOuts
Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress have vowed to pursue a pro-urban agenda next year. What amazes us is that virtually no one in Washington has a clue what that agenda should entail. Our advice: turn away from the failed multibillion-dollar...
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C O M M E N T A R Y: Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century: Threats and Responses
An analysis of global trends in 1998 concluded that subnational and government- sponsored terrorism in the name of "higher principles" was the most intensive in three decades. The costly figures in 1997 (221 dead and 690 wounded) were surpassed on...
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E D I T O R I a L: The Last Caudillo
The June Special Report in Current Issues is on "Castro's Cuba at 40." Castro, who is still lionized by the Left and by our Hollywood celebrities, is a typical Latin American phenomenon. He is a caudillo, ruling despotically over a controlled population....
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E S S A Y: From Fat to Fit
Reversing the Trend of Obesity in America's Kids Patricia L. Fry is a freelance journalist living in California. Each year, American elementary school children are tested for physical agility, endurance, and strength through their ability to...
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E Y E O N T H E H I G H C O U R T: That's the IDEA!
America is at its best when our most powerful institutions protect our most defenseless citizens. That is what happened in the Supreme Court last March, when the Court ruled 7--2 in favor of a 14-year-old physically disabled student from Iowa, in the...
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F O L K W I S D O M: Winning Together
Games and Toys in Traditional Zambia: Part 3 Mice hunting is one of the most cherished boyhood activities among the Tumbuka and Chewa of eastern Zambia. Hunts are usually daylong group expeditions. Their value lies in honing hunting skills, building...
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G A L L E R Y: Jim Alford
Dialogues With Time and Eternity ``I've always been interested in how things change through time," says Santa Fe- -area artist Jim Alford. His paintings of cloud formations, in which reflections open onto the sky at different times of day (or even...
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H E R I T A G E: Old and New
Polish Fest's Memory of Wisconsin Every June, Milwaukee prepares for the annual Polish Fest. Since 1981, the Summerfest grounds on Lake Michigan have become a place to dance the polka, taste pierogi, and experience some of what it means to be Polish....
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H E R I T A G E: The Yellow Rose
Mulatto Goddess of Texas Freedom One of the great truisms about Baja America, otherwise known as the sovereign state of Texas, is that things are done differently down there. It has always been a haven for renegades, rascals, and rogues, a place...
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Just Say No to Salsa
Cuba's Second Revolution Prior to 1991, the bicycle was virtually unseen in Havana; respectable citizens rode buses, the fortunate in Soviet Ladas or '57 Chevy Bel Airs. But the petroleum shortage--gas was rationed for cars, buses converted to diesel,...
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Just Say No to Salsa. (1)
Getting There Since shortly after the Cuban revolution, the United States has enforced a trade and travel ban against Cuba. Currently, Congress, the United Nations, the American public, and even Cuban Americans themselves are debating whether to...
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L I F E A N D I D E A L S: The Lost Ones
For more than thirty years, Charla Pereau has been helping Mexican orphans and the children of Oaxacan indian migrant workers in almost total obscurity. The Oaxacan Indian woman knelt by the side of a narrow dirt road that rarely saw travelers....
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M E D I a I N R E V I E W
Objectivity and the Morning TV News CBS News caused a media firestorm in May 1997 when it announced that Rep. Susan Molinari, who the year before had given the keynote speech at the Republican National Convention, would join CBS as an anchor of...
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M I L L E N N I A L M O M E N T S: Technology: From Trickle to Torrent
The industrial revolutions of the past three centuries spawned a teeming welter of technology that has at once vastly improved and greatly complicated human society. Nothing has so clearly defined the modern world and produced such a revolutionary...
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P E O P L E I N T H E N E W S: Crafter of Conservatism
Conservative pioneer and philosophical traditionalist William Rusher grew up in a most untraditional family, one racked by daily conflict between his parents that was ended only by a decisive divorce. But the pain he experienced year after year...
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P E O P L E S: Coming in 2000
The Holy Land Prepares Brother David looks forward to hearing Jesus' footsteps. And, according to the 58-year-old former upstate New Yorker, he won't have long to wait. David, who long ago dropped his last name, is one of several dozen Christians...
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Rain or Shine
The first Polish Fest was on Labor Day weekend and ran for four full days. Directed by banker Conrad Kaminski, it was envisioned as a great parish picnic and cultural gathering like the ones he recalled as a youngster. The event was put together on...
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S C I E N C E E S S A Y: Whither Our Air and Water?
The United States may well maintain its high-quality air and water through the next century, if it wisely couples advanced technologies with resource stewardship patterns pioneered in the last few decades. As we approach the natural winter equinox...
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S P E C I A L R E P O R T: A Failed Revolution
Visitors to Cuba encounter a country suspended in time--the late 1950s. Though the causes and consequences of Castro's revolution in Cuba have provoked enduring controversy, one point is above dispute: It was (and is) the most radical upheaval in...
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S P E C I A L R E P O R T: Castro's Cuba at 40
Cuba began the year with a defiant celebration of the 40th anniversary of Fidel Castro's revolution amid loud proclamations of the militant motto "Socialism or Death!" The 72-year-old Castro delivered a scathing attack against free-market capitalism...
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The Feminist Attack on Religion
Women have come a long way since the early days of the women's liberation movement in the 1960s and '70s. Few nowadays would deny that American society has become more open and inclusive of women. Throughout most of the Western world, women's equality...
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T H E F E M I N I S T A T T A C K O N R E L I G I O N: How Gender Justice Is Shaking Down Religion at the U.N
Diane Sabom is a freelance writer. ``It makes me so [damn] mad that the Holy See is over here. What right do they have to participate in these discussions! Something must be done to chuck them in the future! How can anyone believe religion even...
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T R A V E L: Just Say No to Salsa
Fantastic beaches, breathtaking scenery, and picturesque villages can be enjoyed while biking the back roads of cuba, but you'll have to get used to the pervasive loud music. Looking north from Havana's seawall, I remember how I'd gaze southward...
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W O R L D V I E W S: The War in the Balkans
Declare war UNITED STATES--What Congress needs to debate is not ground forces but war aims. A resolution that merely sanctions the use of ground forces is woefully insufficient, even irresponsible. That is precisely the kind of open-ended resolution...
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W R I T E R S A N D W R I T I N G: Looking Forward
A profile of Edward Bellamy Linda Simon is associate professor of English at Skidmore College. She is the author, most recently, of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998). When Edward Bellamy's utopian novel Looking Backward...
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