The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 10, October

A Call for a Third Intellectual Revolution-One of Wisdom
There is an urgent need to bring about a revolution in the overall aims and methods of academic inquiry, its whole character and structure, so that it takes up its proper task of promoting wisdom rather than just acquiring knowledge. Academia as...
Read preview Overview
A Poor Boy's Path to the Presidency: The Story of LBJ
In 1921, when Lyndon B. Johnson was in the ninth grade, he told a group of children during recess: "Someday, I'm going to be President of the United States." The other children laughed at him, and said they wouldn't vote for him. Lyndon, who had...
Read preview Overview
Drugs from the Deep Blue
For Tadeusz Molinski, the sea is full of riches, and he does not mean oil fields or fisheries. Molinski, a professor of chemistry at the University of California at Davis, is searching for new treatments for cancer, infectious diseases, and other conditions...
Read preview Overview
Growth Secrets of Alaska's Mysterious Field of Lakes
The thousands of oval lakes that dot Alaska's North Slope are some of the fastest-growing lakes on the planet. Ranging in size from puddles to more than fifteen miles in length, the lakes have expanded at rates up to fifteen feet per year, year in...
Read preview Overview
Introduction
The Editor When a blind and brutal force of nature strikes, there is little that can be done except to move out of the way (if possible) or take the blow and lick one's wounds afterward, thankful that the damage wasn't worse. And so it was with...
Read preview Overview
Katrina, Iraq, and China: The Third Oil Shock?
As Hurricane Katrina made landfall in Louisiana on August 29, oil prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange jumped as much as $4.67 a barrel to hit a high record of $70.80. In the following days, gasoline prices rose by 55 cents (on average) to over...
Read preview Overview
Multicultural Enclaves in Southeastern Kentucky
As a native New Yorker raised in Harlem, I expect major cities to be centers of multicultural history, communities, and experiences. So I wondered what the rural Cumberland Gap region of Kentucky--"bluegrass country" south of Lexington near the Tennessee...
Read preview Overview
Revolutionary Recluse: A Profile of Emily Dickinson
The image of a slight woman in white, running through her father's garden, looking like a large butterfly: Such glimpses of the eminent poet, Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), were rare. Dickinson was a recluse in her Amherst, Massachusetts, home. But the...
Read preview Overview
The Strategic Need for a Peace-Building Military
"War is a force that gives us meaning." These words, the title of a popular recent book by veteran New York Times correspondent Chris Hedges, remind us why those who take the position that war is inevitable arguably have the weight of both experience...
Read preview Overview
Two Dirty Little Secrets in Katrina's Wake
Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita have caused tremendous damage in the South in recent weeks. However, Katrina's ferocious winds and storm surge not only ravaged New Orleans and a wide swath of the Gulf of Mexico coast but exposed a couple of dirty...
Read preview Overview
What's the Probability of Evolution?
The centuries-old "Great Debate Between Religion and Science" is currently generating a great deal of excitement, sound bites of fury, and outraged school-tax payers on both sides. Yet again in these States United, the focus is on the theory of evolution:...
Read preview Overview
Why Hurricanes Can Be So Horrific
During his second voyage to America in 1494, Christopher Columbus and his men encountered a tropical cyclone and had to shelter their fleet. This is the first European record of a hurricane. The Spanish called it huracan, after the Caribbean word Hurican,...
Read preview Overview