Cross Currents

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 4, Winter

From Dogma to Aesthetica: Evangelical Eschatology Gets a Makeover
Entering the sanctuary of a large evangelical church last Christmas, I was struck by the seasonal decorations. Instead of the typical pine-bough swagging and cheery crimson bows, the church had numerous large, white gossamer panels suspended from the...
In the End Shall Christians Become Jews and Jews, Christians? on Franz Rosenzweig's Apocalyptic Eschatology (1)
Gershom Scholem's peerless 1959 essay "Toward an Understanding of the Messianic Idea in Judaism" distinguishes "two major currents" of thought. On the one hand with redemption "the restorative forces are directed to the return and recreation of a past...
On the Significance of the Messianic Idea in Rosenzweig
The works of Franz Rosenzweig have not only become a locus classicus for understanding what it might mean, from a modern Jewish perspective, to conceive of history "messianically." The history of their reception among post-Holocaust Jewish thinkers...
Teaching Our Children Well: Pedagogy, Religion, and the Future of Philosophy
The future of philosophy has been a concern for philosophy ever since its inception. We can find any number of examples of this concern dating as far back as Thales, who had to prove that he could have made money if he really wanted to do so, and as...
The Coming Only Is Sacred: Self-Creation and Social Solidarity in Richard Rorty's Secular Eschatology
Beware then when the great God lets loose a thinker on this planet. Then all things are at risk. It is as when a conflagration has broken out on a great city, and no man knows what is safe, or where it will end. There is not a piece of science but...
The Post-Secular: A Jewish Perspective
The dominant sensibility of our time, in intellectual and spiritual terms, is one of "coming after." In Western discourse, at least, we are clearly in an age of "post"s: post-modern, post-colonial, post-Communist, post-Christian. In Jewish circles...
The Scandal of Hope
It was Immanuel Kant who in his Critique of Pure Reason posed the question, "what may I hope?" (1) A great optimist, Kant circumscribed hope by reason's limits. Such limits however have proved utopian and tragic at once for long after Kant we have...
Unspeakable Utopia: Art and the Return to the Theological in the Marxism of Adorno and Horkheimer
Introduction: The Problem of Culture A spectre has haunted the Marxist tradition from its origins to the present day: the spectre of theology. Born of the quasi-theological ideas of German Romanticism and Idealism, Marxism has always contained traces...
Watch Your Back: Ruminations on the Biblical Poetics of Hope
And it shall come to pass in the behind-the-back days ..."--Isaiah 2:2 ********** It's About Time There are hints in the literature of the Ancient Near East of an orientation to time quite different from our modern, Western version. (1) Americans...