History Review

This journal covers international historical events, people in power and those involved in social movements.

Articles from No. 68, December

Balfour: Graham Goodlad Reviews the Career of A.J. Balfour, an Unsuccessful Prime Minister and Party Leader but an Important and Long-Serving Figure on the British Political Scene
Arthur Balfour was Prime Minister for just over three years, from July 1902 to December 1905. By common consent his term of office was one of the least successful of the twentieth century. The ministry ended with his Unionist Party weakened and divided...
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Czechoslovakia between the Wars: Mary Heimann Restores Czechoslovakia to Its Pivotal Role in the Munich Crisis
The Munich Agreement (29 September 1938), in which Germany, France, Britain and Italy demanded that the 'Sudetenland', as the predominantly German-speaking border regions of Czechoslovakia came to be known, be handed over to the Third Reich, is usually...
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From Georgian to Victorian: Nicholas Dixon Asks Whether There Was a Radical Transition between the Two Eras
The transition between what are commonly termed the Georgian and Victorian eras is one of the great turning points of British history. The dividing line is often considered to be either 1830 (the death of George IV) or 1837 (the accession of Queen...
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How Long before the Sunset? British Attitudes to War, 1871-1914: Rowena Hammal Examines the Fears and Insecurities, as Well as the Bombast and Jingoism, in British Thinking
British attitudes to war in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have frequently been described as 'jingoistic'. This term, which originated in 1878 from a music hall song supporting British intervention in the Russian-Turkish war, is...
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Hung out to Dry? Ian Garrett Looks at the Experience of Coalitions and Minority Governments in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century British Politics
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] No sooner had the dust settled on the inconclusive 2010 election--just a few weeks ago as I type--than Disraeli's famous comment 'England does not love coalitions' was being offered as a judgement on the result, and its possible...
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Margaret of Burgundy: Richard Hughes Asks Whether the 'Diabolical Duchess' Was in Reality Another Tudor Victim
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Students of the closing years of the Wars of the Roses will be aware of Margaret of Burgundy. It was she who was intent on spoiling the party for Henry VII when, so the narrative runs, the great first Tudor was frustrated...
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School Segregation in the USA: Mark Rathbone Puts the Famous 1954 School Segregation Case, Brown V. Board of Education, into Historical Context
Any student of civil rights in the SA knows about Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 Supreme Court case which outlawed racial segregation in schools. The United States Constitution put the Supreme Court at the head of the judicial branch of government:...
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Television and the Decline of Deference Stuart Clayton Ask Whether the Mass Media Have Undermined the Status of Leading Authority Figures in Britain since 1945
Unlike Gladstone and Disraeli, the careers and achievements of David Lloyd George and John Prescott are rarely the subject of fruitful comparative analysis. Yet a glance over their respective biographies does give rise to one interesting comparison:...
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The French Revolution and the Catholic Church: Gemma Betros Examines the Problems the Revolution Posed for Religion, and That Religion Posed for the Revolution
In 1789, the year of the outbreak of the French Revolution, Catholicism was the official religion of the French state. The French Catholic Church, known as the Gallican Church, recognised the authority of the pope as head of the Roman Catholic Church...
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Thomas Cranmer: The Yes-Man Who Said No: Richard Wilkinson Elucidates the Paradoxical Career of One of the Key Figures of English Protestantism
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] One of Thomas Cranmer's few qualifications when Henry VIII made him Archbishop of Canterbury in March 1533 was obsequiousness. It was indeed a strange appointment. Cranmer was an obscure, naive Cambridge theology don with...
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