The American Spectator

American Spectator is a monthly trade magazine published by the American Spectator Foundation. Founded in 1967, the magazine covers politics, culture and current events.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 4, May

About This Month
For a magazine reader, the best book on the ComputerSilicon-Internet-IPO economy, bar none, is Michael Lewis's bestseller The New New Thing (Norton). That's because it reads like good magazine journalism-breezy, smart, anecdotal, as entertaining as it...
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America Plugged In
America Online isn't repeating Microsoft's mistakes. They're just doing what comes naturally in Washington, special interest lobbying," Jeff Chester says of AOL. Chester, the executive director of the Center for Media Education, is one of a gaggle of...
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Back to the Future
Does more efficiency mean smaller profits? I remember, around 1970, wondering what the year 2000 would be like and whether I would still be here. When you do that, you imagine the future in a very hazy, unfocused way, but at least it is different out...
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Canary Yellow
Saturday It's an overcast, miserable afternoon here in gilded Los Angeles. As usual, I have a flu of some kind. I think I've had this flu for twenty years. Despite it, I get quite a lot done, although never enough. Anyway, I awakened a few nights ago...
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Correspondence
Southern Hospitality I love Ben Stein's tribute to American friendliness (especially the Southern variety) in his recent column ("I Was Robbed, TAS, March 2000). Can you believe the zany attitude of our media mavens who rant about gun-packing, bloodthirsty...
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Even in the Middle of Nowhere
IF YOU DRIVE VERY CAREFULLY, YOU MAY GET HERE in a 4x4 vehicle, but even so, it's chancy. The road is only two ruts in the dirt to begin with, and sometimes it vanishes completely. Then you are stuck on a mountain in the middle of nowhere, although at...
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For Your Information
Correct me if I am in error, but the present Computer Civilization that awes us all is essentially absorbed with gathering information and sending it thither. That is why some people speak of the age as the Information Age. Because there is so much more...
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Mopping Up after McCain
How conservatives and the GOP suppressed a mutiny. The McCain mutiny failed. Why? And will this coup attempt create or highlight fissures in the Reagan coalition? Damage the Republican Party? Will the McCain effort go down in history as insignificant...
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No New Cybertaxes
The line stretched through the lobby and out the frosted glass sliding doors of The Standard, one of the newest and most self consciously hip hotels along Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. Young men and women in narrow glasses and Capri pants and tail-out...
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On the Internet No One Knows You're a Dog
Want to get rich quick on the Internet? Good luck. But that hasn't deterred our former New York correspondent. He's spent the last two years getting his own e-business in gear, in the most heated climate imaginable. Here's his progress report. The moment...
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Print Discovers Web
And in doing so, it's finding new ways to lose money. It's hard to believe, but the Internet as it is known today-splashy 24-hour news, entertainment, and information on the World Wide Web-didn't exist six short years ago. Unless you subscribed to a...
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Privacy and Privies; Wagga the Dog; a French Snake; Foxes!
March, which is supposed to come in like a lion and out like a lamb, came in like a lamb and out like a lamb-much to the anxiety of Vice President Al Gore and all his fellow Chicken Littles to whom the arrival of mild weather is a portent of doom. Alas,...
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Psyche in Cyberland
Where plugging in is easier than getting a beer. Hurrying along brightly lit M Street with a friend one brisk Friday night, I was suddenly reminded of the last time I combed Georgetown's main avenue for an appropriate night spot. Much has changed, even...
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Rabble Yell
The Kinder, Gentler Military: Can America's Gender-Neutral Fighting Force Still Win Wars? Stephanie Gutmann Scribner /300 pages l $25 Our armed forces have been slipping toward endangered species status for quite a while now. The United States Army,...
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Ray of Hope
Filegate and the indictments that never came. In March Robert W. Ray, the independent counsel who succeeded Kenneth Starr last October, filed with the pertinent court a report on his office's probe of the FBI files matter, also known as "Filegate." According...
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Rise of the Surveillance State
High-tech whets all the wrong government appetites. While high-tech breakthroughs make business more productive and life more pleasant, progress also has a dark side. Technology designed for benign purposes can be used for ill ones too. The Clinton administration...
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Should We Tax the Internet? No, Never, Nohow
Why do Republicans, when they become rich, suffer so masochistically, so hemophilicly, so hemorrhoidally so hemorrhagically from the tax-raising itch? In the last month, two friendly billionaires confided to me that their gravest political fear was not...
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Should We Tax the Internet? Yes, for Efficiency's Sake
Arguing in favor of Internet taxation is a tough job, especially among people who are not Luddite Marxists, but somebody has to do it. And it takes some nuanced arguments that go like this. First, we have to define what we mean by "taxing the Internet."...
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The Color of the Future
Creating Equal: My Fight Against Race Preferences Ward Connerly Encounter Books l 285 pages l $24.95 The Debt: What America Owes to Blacks Randall Robinson Dutton l 262 pages / $23.95 REVIEWED BY Roger Clegg oth Ward Connerly and Randall Robinson are...
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The Microsoft Moral
Repeal the antitrust laws, for starters. Microsoft's shareholders may be frustrated by the company's inability to negotiate a settlement with Joel Klein and his minions at the Justice Department. As expected, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's conclusions...
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The Old Regime and the Digital Revolution
At an information and communications technology fair in Milan last fall, where at every turn there seemed to be a barely clad go-go dancer touting the Wireless Application Protocol or a wide-screen spectacular on the virtues of digital television, I...
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There's Something about Tom
His chances of ousting California incumbent Dianne Feinstein may not be good, but Silicon Valley's Rep. Tom Campbell is by far the most impressive GOP Senate challenger this year. Tim W FERGUSON is a Los Angeles-based editor of Forbes. The most interesting...
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They Still Can't Touch Him
Way Out There in the Blue: Reagan, Star Wars and the End of the Cold War Frances FitzGerald Simon & Schuster /592 pages / $30 In the last sentence, the very last sentence, of Way Out There in the Blue, Frances FitzGerald considers the most recent...
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They Went Thataway
Hollywood villains are no longer even two-dimensional. What's happened to the movie bad guy? How can we have any heroes when all they have to cut their teeth on are the meager malefactors and wimpy wrong-doers that now populate our screens? The controversy...
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Twentieth-Century Pox
Twentieth-Century America: A Brief History Thomas C. Reeves Oxford /368 pages /$30 Do we really need another history of America in the last century? Maybe not, but my reason for picking up Thomas C. Reeves's Twentieth Century America wasn't to acquire...
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Vandals in the Churchyard
The Western war against Christianity goes unreported. One typical March weekend in Brooklyn: Vandals smash the face and arms of a marble shrine to Our Lady of Fatima at St. Gregory's Roman Catholic Church. The same night, a wooden image of Christ is...
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