The American Spectator

American Spectator is a monthly trade magazine published by the American Spectator Foundation. Founded in 1967, the magazine covers politics, culture and current events.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 11, November

About This Month
For a man widely derided for not having much to say, George W Bush is sure being listened to closely. It never fails. If he's hesitant, say, to blast Pat Buchanan into kingdom come, the media jump right back into John McCain's arms. But if he blasts...
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A Principled Maverick
Can an exception rule? The case of Rep. Ron Paul. In Congress party discipline is vital. Leadership craves a tight ship where all hands can be counted on to row in the same direction. So many congressmen bridled when, after stressing the need for everyone...
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A Sport and a Pastime
Hemingway: The Final Years Michael Reynolds WW Norton 14.z6pages / $30 True at First Light Ernest Hemingway Scribner /319 pages / $26 Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961) is as famous for what he did while he wasn't writing as for what he actually wrote. More...
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Au Revoir, Pop
Wednesday Along, long time ago, maybe in about 1954, my father and I went to a hobby shop in Maryland, possibly near Baltimore, possibly near a store called Hochschild Kohn. I was probably nine or ten. My father bought for me a yellow and white model...
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Bill Perry's Asian Portfolio
Appeasing North Korea gives him time for serious work. Alarmed by satellite photographs of a new underground nuclear site at Kumchang-ni and by North Korea's August 1998 test of a three-stage missile, President Clinton last fall appointed former Defense...
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Contempt of Congress
Bill Clinton's legacy? On Capitol Hill, he'll be the man who proved you could stiff-arm congressional investigations-and get away with it. Bill Clinger knows what it's like to be in the minority on Capitol Hill. The Pennsylvania Republican, who served...
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Correspondence
The Skinny on Gore I was amazed to see in last month's Continuing Crisis comments to the effect that nudists were prominent Gore constituents. I can't imagine where this information came from other than the typical misunderstanding that society has about...
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Cuba's New Revolutionaries
The Tamarindo 34 group is defying Castro's controls. Tamarindo Street in Havana is poor, even by Cuban standards. The buildings are dirty and crumbling, and the lively shades of pink, red, and green that originally decorated their facades have long since...
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From Kosovo to Kansas
When does Congress interfere in foreign policy-making? The American Political Science Review, offering up its distinctive blend of science and politics, chides Congress for obstructing the president's conduct of foreign policy. The Senate, for example,...
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Hazy Days Are Here Again
The Republicans in Congress are in a haze. Nothing seems to turn out right. And the congressional Democrats harass them mercilessly. One of the Democrats' favored instruments for harassment is insistence on a periodic increase in the federal minimum...
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Hot Properties
Perhaps there is a symmetry to it. One month the Clintons are mired in scandal, the next month their political opposites attract the hornets' nest. This past month has been scandal-free for the Clintons-relatively speaking, of course: Reverberations...
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Jesse's World
The rules are known, the stakes are high, and one of Washington's great contests is played out accordingly. Jesse Helms will thrust, and the White House will parry. As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Helms will demand straight answers,...
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Las Vegas Nights
THE NIGHT BEFORE WHAT HAD BEEN MODEs-my billed as the Fight of the Millennium, I thought of A.J. Liebling and headed for La Scala, in the fluorescent heart of Las Vegas's MGM Grand. The keenest chronicler of boxing in his (and my) time, Joe Liebling...
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Psyched out in Left Field
The APA's psychologists never shrink from controversy. In August 16,500 people came to Boston for the American Psychological Association's annual convention. The APA, which represents 159,000 clinicians, researchers, and educators, bills itself as the...
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She Couldn't Wait
Most pols first get elected before acting like Hillary. Since the days when President Johnson raised his pajama top and showed news photographers the scar from his then-recent gall bladder operation, and the New York Times printed a hospital announcement...
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Switch Hits
Why do Democrats keep jumping to the GOP? One of the most underreported stories of the Clinton era is the unprecedented number of elected Democrats who have switched to the GOP since Bill Clinton's election on November 3,1992. The establishment press...
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The Floyd Fiasco
Like TV weathermen, the Feds love the hurricane season. Hurricane Floyd-perhaps the most overhyped hurricane in Weather Channel historywound up killing at least 70 people and causing billions of dollars in damages. But most of the deaths and damage occurred...
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The GOP's Hearing Loss
IF YOU WANT TO KNOW WHY REPUBLICANS ARE LOSING, TRY TESTIFYING AS ONE OF THEIR EXPERT WITNESSES. Daniel E. Troy Five years after winning the majority, House Republicans still have no idea how to wield power. They do not know how to protect their friends...
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Their Times
The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind The New York Times Susan E. Tifft andAlex S. Jones Little, Brown / 870 pages / $29.95 The Ochses and Sulzbergers are "arguably the most powerful blood-related dynasty in twentieth-century America," Susan...
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The Money Chase
McConnell, not McCain, is the profile in courage. The touted advocate of reform, Sen. John McCain ofArizona, isn't really very interested in the details of campaign finance law. But he's good at having it both ways: complaining about the money in the...
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The Reluctant Speaker
DENNIS HASTERT IS A SOLID, DECENT, WELL-LIKED MAN. IS THAT ENOUGH TO SAVE HIS FRACTIOUS PARTY? Ask anyone about Denny Hastert and the first things you hear are always the same-he's a nice guy, hard working, dependable, a man of his word. Everyone says...
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The Tender Trap
Cynicism and paranoia are no match for love and honor. One of the little-noticed sideeffects of the sexual revolution has been its effect on the arts, and in particular upon the classic romance. Random Hearts, starring Harrison Ford and Kristin Scott...
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Tory Gay Chic
And why Gary Bauer will never enjoy its advantages. I suppose it was inevitable. Over the years, we straight white males have heard it all -we're all racists, according to the multi cultural ists; we're all rapists, according to the feminists-and meekly...
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Waiting for George W
The GOP is exhausted by its effort to govern from Capitol Hill. Republicans have learned about the filibuster and the presidential veto. They want unified government and to see Governor Bush elected president. Roy Blunt represents Missouri's seventh...
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