Human Ecology

Reports news and information of particular interest to the faculty and alumni of the New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. Features short, signed articles written by the college?s faculty and students, and coverage of the college?

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 2, Spring

At the Heart of the Matter
We may be closer than you think to reversing genetic tendencies toward cardiovascular disease. Biochemistry professor Andre Bensadoun is attacking heart disease at the genomic level. He studies an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, one that removes...
Carpets in Schools Don't Compromise Indoor Air Quality
Carpets in schools can help the quality of indoor air by trapping contaminants and allergens, says a Human Ecology indoor environmental expert. The findings run counter to growing concerns of some doctors, parents, and schools that carpeting might...
Crowded Homes Are Stressful
Dispelling widely held myths about various ethnic groups' tolerance of crowding, a new Cornell study finds that Asian Americans and Latin Americans are just as uncomfortable in crowded homes as are Anglo Americans (Americans of European descent) and...
Genetics and Aging
Evidence points to a gene that may affect the onset of degenerative diseases like arthritis and Alzheimer's. Martha Stipanuk may have found a genetic predisposition that causes rheumatoid arthritis and several degenerative neurological diseases...
Genomics and Human Ecology
As we all heard, the Human Genome Project and the Celera Group published the working draft of the human genome in February this year. Barbara R. Jasny and Donald Kennedy described the accomplishment in terms of what we can now learn about ourselves:...
Genomics: The Frontier Within
Cornell researchers are laying the groundwork for a new era in science and human understanding. February 12, 2001, is a date destined for the history books, for it marks the beginning of a new era in science and in human under-standing. The release...
Midlife Crisis Less Common Than Many Believe
Although more than 25 percent of Americans over age 35 think they have had a midlife crisis, more than half of these were no more than "stressful life events," says sociologist Elaine Wethington. And contrary to the traditional view, she says, women...
Nature V. Nurture Goes High Tech
The human genome permits a closer look at the interaction between genes and the environment. Think about your genes as a hand you've been dealt in a game of cards, suggests Patrick Stover, associate professor of nutritional sciences and the first...
Policy for the Technology
It takes a university to address new issues genomics raises. In addition to nutritional sciences and human development, policy analysis and management is the third area of Human Ecology most directly connected to the Cornell Genomics Initiative...
Rethinking Policy in a Brave New World
Your genotype could be a matter of public concern. David Pelletier, associate professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences, knows that the brave new world of genomics has those who devise public policy racing to catch up. Pelletier is a...
Should We?
The slippery slope of medical ethics in the age of technology. A couple who is unable to conceive and unwilling to adopt could clone a baby from the cells of either partner. What are the ramifications? Genetic tests can indicate a list of diseases...