Human Ecology

Reports news and information of particular interest to the faculty and alumni of the New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. Features short, signed articles written by the college?s faculty and students, and coverage of the college?

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, Spring

Breathe Easy
Indoor air can be a serious health hazard, yet managing the risks can be easy and inexpensive. So says healthy homes advocate Joseph Laquatra, co-author of a consumer education program that has reached more individuals than any other national indoor...
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Cutting Health Care Spending
Roger Battistella likes to bring his point home through a story he once read in the Wall Street Journal. It goes like this. Although there was little hope, the family of a dying man urged his doctor to use every available heroic measure to save...
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Ergonomics Then and Now
The bridge from the college's beginnings its work today is paved with the efforts of countless scholars who have sought to improve people's lives. Work to improve life in the work environment began 100 years ago with the Small Publication Saving Steps...
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Fiber Science Meets Medicine
New Biodegradable Hydrogels Can Repair Tissue, Deliver Drugs Fiber scientist C. C. Chu was looking for new medical uses for biomaterials. Rather than use existing products, he decided to develop his own. An estimated 40 million Americans have...
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Fortified Drink
To Boost Health of Children in Developing World A FORTIFIED, ORANGE-flavored powdered drink, tested in Tanzania by Cornell University researchers who found it can significantly help improve children s nutrition and growth, has been launched as a...
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Housework Is Just as Tough Today as It Was 60 Years Ago
DESPITE THE LATEST electronic, ergonomic, and timesaving devices to aid housework, the most tiring household tasks are still scrubbing and mopping the floors, just as they were more than 60 years ago, according to a new Cornell University study. ...
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Study Looks at Effects of Co-Working on Work and Family Life
A NEW CORNELL University study suggests that childless couples who work for the same employer tend to experience lower life quality and have less egalitarian marriages than co-working couples with children and childless couples who work for different...
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Study Offers Data on the Work and Family Careers of N.Y. Couples
EVEN THOUGH WOMEN work--and prefer to work--fewer hours than men, they invest more of themselves in their jobs than do male workers. That is just one finding from the Cornell Couples and Career Study, which includes one of the most detailed databases...
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The Key to Public Health Is Community
The movement called community health means more than just access to health care. It's strong families, good schools, safe neighborhoods, caring adults, and economic opportunities. It's powered by individuals and organizations in the community and collaborations...
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Two New Books Look at Weighty Issues
HOW DO BRIDES PREPARE for their weddings when it comes to their weight? What do overweight women do to resist the social stigma of being fat? How does society dictate what the "ideal" woman should weigh? Are vegetarians too skinny, or vibrant and healthy?...
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Value Our Past, Create Our Future
We launch our celebration of the centennial of the hire of Martha Van Rensselaer in 1900 this June at our Alumni Reunion Weekend. Her hire was a pivotal moment that led to the development at Cornell University of the first outreach program for women...
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Value Our Past, Create Our Future
In the spring of 1900, the New York State legislature introduced a bill to establish a department in home economics at Cornell University. Although the bill was tabled, the seed was planted for a course of study that would evolve and grow. The individual...
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Vitamin E-How Much Is Enough?
Vitamin E is an important antioxidant, with the potential for reducing risk for many diseases. But how much do people need to ingest to get the benefits? Studies by nutrition researcher Robert Parker and his colleagues may provide the answer. There...
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