Human Ecology

Reports news and information of particular interest to the faculty and alumni of the New York State College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. Features short, signed articles written by the college?s faculty and students, and coverage of the college?

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 3, September

Alumni Reflections on the Gerontology Concentration: Living and Learning
The undergraduate concentration in gerontology includes classroom work that explores aging through biology, psychology, sociology, economics, and design; the concentration also features experiential learning, which provides opportunities outside...
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Back to Nature: A Relationship with Nature over the Life Course Can Affect Our Well-Being, Ability to Manage Stress, Cognitive Development, and Social Integration
Nancy Wells is pleased with her office in the east wing of Martha Van Rensselaer Hall precisely for its view of trees and of Beebe Lake in the winter. "It's nice to live what I preach," she says, referring to her environs. An assistant professor...
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Changing Life Course Patterns
Life course studies are becoming more central to our understanding of the needs of individuals, families, and communities as we experience ever more rapid changes in our world today. The demographics of our country are changing, we are living longer,...
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College Collaborates in Institute on Employee Health and Well-Being: A New Research Center at Cornell, a Collaboration with a Michigan Health-Information Firm, Will Study Issues of Employee Health and Productivity in the Workplace
HOW DO THE HEALTH AND well-being of employees drive business productivity and profitability? How do depression, stress, musculoskeletal disorders, migraines, obesity, and pain affect productivity, and what kinds of management practices can help?...
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Extension Program Fosters Youth Community Service: A Program Developed by Cornell Cooperative Extension Encourages Young People to Become Involved in Intergenerational Opportunities within Their Communities
SIMPLE GIFTS is a program designed to help adults show youth how to make recreational items specific for people with Alzheimer's disease. The program was developed by Charlotte Coffman, senior extension associate in the college's Department of Textiles...
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Family Relationships in Adulthood: For the First Time, Parents and Children Can Expect to Share 30, 40, 50, or Even More Years of Their Lifetimes as Adults. as a Result, Family Relationships Are in New Territory. There Are Few Societal Guidelines for How Intergenerational Relationships Ought to Take Place
The life course approach to human development considers not only growth throughout adulthood but also how life decisions can affect more than one generation within a family. This poses intriguing questions for those who study relationships within...
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Indoor Air Pollutants in Homes and Child-Care Centers May Put Children at Risk: Unsafe Levels of Radon, Lead, and Mold Present in Some Low-Income Households and Child-Care Facilities Threaten the Health of Children
IN AREAS PRONE TO HIGH radon levels, homes occupied by limited-resource households have significantly higher levels of radon than those occupied by higher-income households, and some child-care centers have unsafe levels of radon, lead, and mold,...
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Neighborhood Dynamics and Educational Attainment: Education Can Help Youth Break out of the Cycle of Poverty. but First They Must Break Free of Any Negative Influences of the Neighborhoods in Which They Live. A Lot Depends on the Expectations Their Communities Have for Them
With more than 2 million youth living below the poverty line, it is imperative to figure out how to make a positive difference in the lives of young people. One thing is becoming apparent: the kind of neighborhood children grow up in has an important...
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Nutritionists Attribute Postpartum Weight Loss to Daily Exercise and Positive Attitude: Intention and Confidence, Researchers Say, Are the Strongest Predictors as to Whether Women Will Exercise Frequently and Lose Weight after Giving Birth
MOTHERS WHO EXERCISE DAILY a year after the birth of their first child are, on average, 12 pounds lighter than overweight mothers who rarely work out, reports a new study by researchers in the Division of Nutritional Sciences. What sets the exercisers...
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The Template of Our Lives: Times Have Changed, and Many of the Assumptions, Policies, and Practices That Underlie Our Society Run Counter to How Americans Want to Live Their Lives. Baby Boomers Now Approaching the Last Third of Their Lives May Want to Leave Their Jobs but Not Necessarily Retire from Work. Will They Find Productive Roles to Serve?
The day after Karen Hughes, President Bush's most intimate political adviser, went public with her resignation. Phyllis Moen received a call from a major newspaper. But Moen's comments never appeared in the paper because, she says, she didn't say...
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Tipping the Social Scales: Body Weight in Dating and Marriage
In our culture, body weight has shifted from a private, personal concern to a public, Social Issue. Nutritional sociologist Jeffery Sobal is examining how attitudes about body Weight, and body Weight itself, change throughout the life course, particularly...
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When You're 65: Medicare Managed Care Is an Attractive Option for Elderly and Disabled Americans, but It May Not Survive without Reform. Policy Analyst John Cawley Proposes a Way to Make It Work More Efficiently and Fairly
Ben Franklin recognized that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure long before health maintenance organizations (HMOs) were created with roughly the same principle in mind. HMOs have been around only 25 years, but it has been a tumultuous...
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