The Human Life Review

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2/3, Spring

Abortion as Sacramental Moment?
"We permit bad taste in this country. In fact, we even encourage it and reward it in all manner of ways." -John Irving, Mother Jones Magazine, May/June, 1997 If Hollywood were to offer us a movie in which a father, guilty of incest with his daughter,...
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A Consistent Ethic of Love
Every bishop takes a motto, and that of Cardinal John O'Connor was "There Can Be No Love Without Justice." This, indeed, was the theme of his life on earth. He both preached and lived "love" not as some vague abstraction or spiritual entity separate...
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A Democrat Who Never Stopped Championing the Weak
"A pro-life Democrat can't lose," Bob Casey used to say of the presidency. His theory was that the Democratic Party had lost its way, abandoned its calling to protect the weak and forgotten and powerless. Millions of Republicans were former Democrats...
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A Magnificent Ride
"JOHN CARDINAL O'CONNOR: 1920-2000." When that appeared, silently, on TV screens at 10:30 p.m. on May 3, viewers who'd been tuned in since that afternoon's press conference knew the hour of death had finally come for this Prince of the Church, for 16...
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A Moral Muddle
What this country needs is a good, consistent theology of human life. I am not here to offer it. I am here to illustrate the need. Human life? Good, apple-cheeked-well, occasionally not quite applecheeked-life? Innocent, gurgling, carpool-driving, tennis-ball-swatting...
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A Season for Chameleons: Abortion and the Court
When the helicopters lifted off the roof of the American embassy in Saigon in 1975, and that project of American arms was allowed to collapse, President Gerald Ford went on television to reassure and calm the country. His message was that this was no...
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A Yarmulke at the March
When I heard the news that John Cardinal O'Connor had passed away, my thoughts went to a cold, blustery day in late January. On that winter morning I woke, laid the ritual Jewish phylacteries (tefillin), recited the morning prayers, and took the 181st...
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Britain's Cultural Conspiracy?
The Sex Change Society: Feminised Britain and the Neutered Male is the title of a new book by the well-known columnist and commentator Melanie Phillips. It concerns the culture of divorce and illegitimacy currently plaguing Great Britain and the great...
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Candor and the Court
Responding to conflicting appellate court decisions, the United States Supreme Court is now reviewing the constitutionality of the bans by some states on "partial-birth" abortion. Because of the unusually graphic candor found in those prior decisions,...
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Cardinal O'Connor, R.I.P
He was a voice for hope, and the renewal of innocence. John Joseph Cardinal O'Connor, the Archbishop of New York, has died at age 80. For the last 16 years, he had served as spiritual leader of 2.4 million Catholics in Manhattan and its environs. In...
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Cheering on the Survivors at the Oscars
Non-amateur writers avoid industriously the word Orwellian, because even years ago it became an overused and underdefined cliche. But try to find another word for what Michael Caine came up with at the Oscar ceremony on Sunday on receiving a prize for...
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Holy Innocents
Cardinal O'Connor was a great friend to the Review; he was also, as you read in my mother, Faith's, moving account, a true friend and source of strength to my parents during my late father's difficult years of illness. I didn't know him as well, and...
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Introduction
THIS DOUBLE ISSUE celebrates over 25 years of continuous publication of the Human Life Review. We are thankful to be going strong, more than a year and a half after the death of our founder, editor and my beloved father, J.P. McFadden, who published...
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John Cardinal O' Connor, R.I.P
The death of Cardinal John Joseph O'Connor, on May 3rd, was a blow not only to Catholics, but to those of all faiths and of none. This was clear in the accolades that came pouring forth in the days after his death, from people widely scattered along...
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Just for Being
When I was growing up, Advent and Lent were two very large blocks of measurable time and getting through them took patience and determination. To make the wait less tedious, and to help us understand what it was we were waiting for, my parents had certain...
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Mourning the Loss of Cardinal O'Connor
The funeral of Cardinal John O'Connor at St. Patrick's Cathedral on 50th Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan on Monday was stuffed with the powerful and the formerly powerful, presidents and ex-presidents, governors and ex-governors, mayors and ex-mayors....
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Not My Rosary?
That miserably cold January afternoon seemed colder than ever because I knew my friend Cardinal O'Connor was losing his battle against the tumor on his brain. He had not complained; he accepted it all, feeling even closer to his Lord, showing courage...
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Profile Voting: More Than a Hill of Beans
By the time this essay is published, the year 2000 candidates for high office will be accelerating toward their final clash in November, their respective salvific promises and rhetorical flourishes flapping like battle pennants in the wind. The sights...
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Remembering Him
I knew Cardinal John O'Connor for many years. His death, however sad, is an occasion for me to think back on the extraordinary man I was privileged to call a friend. He had two main passions. One was the sanctity of every individual life. That meant...
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She's Not Doc's Only Victim
Maggie Gallagher Here's the story (those of you with weak stomachs, avert your eyes): A 31-year old divorced nurse in the Bronx has an affair with 44-year-old Dr. Stephen Pack. The nurse lives with her toddler and her parents in a modest Cape Cod in...
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The Abortion Rules
The first thing to say about The Cider House Rules is that it is not literature, but pro-abortion propaganda. The second thing to say is that, despite generally poor reviews (about which more below), the last time I looked it had climbed midway up the...
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The Cider House Rots
Homer Wells is an atypical sort of prodigal son. Being an orphan, he has no father to disappoint, let alone to be welcomed home by. Instead, this protagonist of The Cider House Rules, the Oscar-winning film based on John Irving's novel of the same name,...
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The Cider House Rules-Not!
When The Cider House Rules came out this year, you wouldn't have had an inkling, from the print ads or previews, that it was a film about abortion-- unless, of course, you were familiar with John Irving's 1985 novel of the same name. Indeed, a non-controversial,...
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The Dying of the Mind
Times change, and as they change, so do attitudes. Think back to the 1960's, when the Sexual Revolution began (or at least came to the surface of popular consciousness). Then even the New York Times was somewhat shocked by the spread of homosexuality,...
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The Ex-Abortionists: Why They Quit
As a young doctor in the early 1970s, Paul E. Jarrett, Jr., did a number of legal abortions. He began having doubts, though, after the urea-induced abortion of a mental patient. The child, weighing two pounds, was born alive, and the mother screamed,...
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The Human Life Review: John Cardinal O'Connor, R.I.P
The Irishman in Cardinal John O'Connor must enjoy watching those who had little truck for him in life rushing to offer their hosannas now that he is safely dead. Yet it's hard to believe that the cardinal wouldn't take even the praise as something of...
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The Illusion of Animal Rights
You might be wondering what an article on animal rights is doing in a journal devoted to the defence of human life. It turns out that the connections are closer than you may think. Grasping them is crucial to a proper understanding ofjust why innocent...
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The Sisters of Life: An Interview with Agnes Mary Donovan
The congregation of the Sisters of Life was founded in 1991 by Cardinal John O'Connor of New York to promote the sanctity of human life. Among the first to join, Mother Agnes Mary Donovan, S. V, has been superior general since 1993; she resides at the...
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The Zygote and Personhood
In 1938, when abortion was not an "issue" and people took the life of the unborn child for granted, Margaret Shea Gilbert produced a small book entitled Biography of the Unborn. Not only did the general public look favorably on the work, but the Williams...
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Under Oregon's Iron Shroud: Real People, Real Deaths
Killing is most easily done in the shadows, behind closed curtains, under cover of darkness where nobody can see. So it isn't surprising that Oregon bureaucrats imposed an iron shroud of secrecy over assisted suicide, which that state's voters legalized...
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