African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 4, Winter

Dwelling in the House of Oppression: The Spatial, Racial, and Textual Dynamics of Harriet Wilson's Our Nig
Harriet Wilson's Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black, in a Two-Story White House, North. Showing that Slavery's Shadows Fall Even There (1859) is considered to be the first novel published by an African American woman. Set in a New...
Furrowing All the Brows: Interpretation and the Transcendent in Toni Morrison's Paradise
Whether the motto on the Oven is "Beware the Furrow of His Brow," "Be the Furrow of His Brow," or even "We Are the Furrow of His Brow" or Her Brow, God's brow is not the only one that is furrowed in Toni Morrison's seventh novel, Paradise. The brows...
Nella Larsen and the Intertextual Geography of Quicksand
Toward the middle of her 1928 novel Quicksand, Nella Larsen thematizes her authorial relation to the literary past in a scene that uncannily adumbrates the future demise of her career. Larsen's protagonist, Helga Crane, pores over the writing of her...
Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, and the Case of Angelo Herndon
The judge interrupted me angrily. "All right," said he, "that's enough, I want no speeches from you. What I want to know is whether you'll work if you'll get a job?" "Yes, your honor, if you have a job to give me I'll surely work." The judge...
Teddy Harris's Work
Teddy Harris's work is the modernism of everyday perception and rationale. He makes works from vouchsafes and unrealized dreams, lies and advertisements for nowhere. That is, he takes scraps of America North and threads them through his truthoscopic...
The Negro Artist and the Racial Manor: Infants of the Spring and the Conundrum of Publicity
Somehow, somewhere, black writers and creators had lost control of their subjects and, with them, some of the Harlem Renaissance. (Mumford 155) In a recent essay on the critical reception of Jennie Livingston's acclaimed documentary Paris Is Burning...
"The Porch Couldn't Talk for Looking": Voice and Vision in 'Their Eyes Were Watching God.'(Zora Neale Hurston)(Critical Essay)
"So 'tain't no use in me telling you somethin' unless Ah give you de understandin' to go 'long wid it. Unless you see do fur, a mink skin ain't no different from a coon hide." (Hurston, Their Eyes 7) When Janie explains to her friend Pheoby the...