African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 4, Winter

"Ambivalent Man": Ellison's Rejection of Communism
"I too have become acquainted with ambivalence," I said. "That's why I'm here." Ambivalence. No term--in a novel written immediately after World War II by an African American with a history of involvement in left-wing causes--could be more laden...
Discipline and Craft: An Interview with Sonia Sanchez
Best known as a poet and playwright, Sonia Sanchez has also written short stories, children's books, critical essays, and columns for various periodicals. Sanchez was born Wilsonia Benita Driver in Birmingham, Alabama, in September 1934, the daughter...
Harryette Mullen, "The Queen of Hip Hyperbole": An Interview
On September 20-24, 1999, the poet, essayist, and short story writer Harryette Mullen was Writer-in-Residence at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, along with novelists John Edgar Wideman and Percival Everett. The program which brought the authors...
"Looking at One's Self through the Eyes of Others": W. E. B. Du Bois's Photographs for the 1900 Paris Exposition
In The Souls of Black Folk, W. E. B. Du Bois describes." Double-consciousness" as the "sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others" (8), and thereby situates a visual model of subjectivity at the center of what he calls "the strange...
"Some Cord of Kinship Stronger and Deeper Than Blood": An Interview with John F. Callahan, Editor of Ralph Ellison's Juneteenth
Over the decades since the publication of Invisible Man in 1952, anticipation in the literary community about Ralph Waldo Ellison's second novel was fervent and continuous. Ellison dropped hints of its near completion in various interviews, even after...
"The Singing Man Who Must Be Reckoned With": Private Desire and Public Responsibility in the Poetry of Countee Cullen
His lyric gift was incontestable and, indeed, exceptional. But his poetry has none of McKay's fiery virility, and the treasures it encloses are, rather, those of a soul that at times indulged in an excess of sensibility and preferred to express itself...
Waste and Whiteness: Zora Neale Hurston and the Politics of Eugenics
Readings of Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee (1948) have often focused on the text's racial and gender problems, either critiquing the text's failure to measure up to the racial consciousness and feminism evident in Their Eyes Were Watching...