African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 4, Winter

A Critical Divination: Reading Sula as Ogbanje-Abiku
Isn't it just possible that we are all abikus? ... [W]hy should there be some and not others? Why should the universe be distributed that way? (Ben Okri, Interview with Jane Wilkinson) Egbe here, Ugo here.... May the Hawk perch, [and] may the Eagle...
Athletic Iconography in Spike Lee's Early Feature Films
By virtually any standard, Spike Lee is a dedicated follower of professional sports. In winter, he can often be seen courtside at New York Knicks games, jawing at opposing players; in interviews, he has claimed that he grew up wanting to be a professional...
Cosmopolitanism in Georgia Douglas Johnson's Anti-Lynching Literature
In December 1874, the African Methodist Episcopal Church changed the design on the front page of its major publication, the Christian Recorder. The new banner featured an image of the continent of Africa, apparently emphasizing the American church...
John Marrant and the Narrative Construction of an Early Black Methodist Evangelical
On the cold winter morning of January 27, 1788, John Marrant boarded a ship headed for Boston and departed from the Halifax, Nova Scotia, port for the final time. For almost three years he had preached to a dedicated and growing congregation of Loyalist...
"My Characters Are Teaching Me to Be Strong": An Interview with Tananarive Due
Tananarive Due, is originally from Tallahassee, Florida, and now resides in Southern California. She earned a BS in journalism from Northwestern University and an MA in English with an emphasis on Nigerian literature from the University of Leeds in...
The "Maw of Western Culture": James Baldwin and the Anxieties of Influence
In No Name in the Street, his 1972 autobiography, James Baldwin reports a curious memory. A "young white man, beautiful, Jewish, American," Baldwin recalls, "ate his wife's afterbirth, frying it in a frying pan": He did this because--who knows--Wilhelm...
The Named and the Nameless: Morrison's 124 and Naylor's "The Other Place" as Semiotic Chorae
Everybody knew what she was called, but nobody anywhere knew her name. --Toni Morrison, Beloved (274) All Willow Springs knows that this woman was nobody's slave. But what was her name?--Gloria Naylor, Mama Day (280) Naming is an act of creation....
The Ontogeny and Phylogeny of Mackey's Song of the Andoumboulou (1)
"The thought of Being guards the word and fulfills its functions in such guardianship, namely care for the use of language. Out of long guarded speechlessness and the careful clarification of the field thus cleared, comes the utterance of tire thinker....
The Rhetoric of Mobility, the Politics of Consciousness: Julia Mood Peterkin and the Case of a White Black Writer
The negroes have no books, they cannot read and they know nothing of how to write. Yet by word of mouth they have handed down through generations strange and beautiful myths. They sit over their fires and talk about them, tell them to their children.......
"This Plague of Their Own Locusts": Space, Property, and Identity in Dorothy West's the Living Is Easy
The August 2000 issue of Vanity Fair revived the concept of the "it girl," citing Gwyneth Paltrow as the embodiment of "it" for the twenty-first century amongst a retrospective parade of former "it girls." The "it girl" became a part of American cultural...