African American Review

Founded in 1967, the African American Review is a quarterly journal published by St. Louis University, located in St. Louis, Mo. Its subject matter is literature and black publications. Its managing editor is Aileen Keenan.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, Summer

Ambrosia and Pure Spring Water
Every summer she and her husband drive down to the country to spend time with her mother and grandmother. She looks forward to these visits, especially now that the children are grown and gone. No alarms, flailing limbs, and roller coaster emotions...
Early Black Women Playwrights and the Dual Liberation Motif
In the introduction to the section of his Black Theater USA anthology entitled "Early Plays by Black Women," James V. Hatch recalls Eldridge Cleaver's observation about the myth of the strong black woman. "He [the white man] turned the black woman...
Giving Blood to the Scraps, Haints, History, and Hosea in 'Beloved.' (Black Women's Culture Issue)
Let's face it: Toni Morrison's Beloved can only be re-read. But the challenges posed by this novel ought not to be confused with the mere "fascination of what's difficult" that Yeats complains has "dried the sap out of [his] veins." To the contrary,...
Journey into Speech - a Writer between Two Worlds: An Interview with Michelle Cliff
Among the subjects Jamaican born writer Michelle Cliff explores in her writings are ancestry, the impact of colonization on the Caribbean, the relationships among and interconnection of African people in the diaspora, racism, and the often erroneous...
"Ladies First": Queen Latifah's Afrocentric Feminist Music Video
Although they have been featured in a number of newspaper articles, feminist rappers have not received sufficient critical attention. Three recent books on rap (Costello and Wallace; Spencer; and Toop) ignore female rappers, and as recently as March...
Orpheus Ascending: Music,race, and Gender in Adrienne Kennedy's 'She Talks to Beethoven.' (Black Women's Culture Issue)
A drienne Kennedy's recent play She Talks to Beethoven first appeared in Antaeus in the spring of 1991 and was subsequently included as the first of the Alexander Plays published by the University of Minnesota Press in 1992. Alisa Solomon's observation...
Quiet as It's Kept
When Mother got close to talk, I moved away. There wasn't anything wrong with Mother. Not really. She still had a pleasant smell about her--Moonlight Rose, I think. Her body was attractive, for an older woman. Maybe that was my problem. My friends...
Recovering the Conjure Woman: Texts and Contexts in Gloria Naylor's 'Mama Day.' (Black Women's Culture Issue)
"There are just too many sides to the whole story," Cocoa tells George near the conclusion of Gloria Naylor's 1988 novel Mama Day (311). The truth of this remark is reinforced by the structure of the novel itself--by the fact that Cocoa's words are...
"These Are the Facts of the Darky's History": Thinking History and Reading Names in Four African American Texts
In every era the attempt must be made anew to wrest tradition away from a conformism that is about to overpower it.... Only that historian will have the gift of fanning the spark of hope in the past who is firmly convinced that even the dead will not...
Voice and Interiority in Zora Neale Hurston's 'Their Eyes Were Watching God.' (Black Women's Culture Issue)
Consistent critical attention focuses on Janie's voice because, as Michael Awkward has stated, "Perhaps the dominant image in the recent creative and critical writing of Afro-American women [is] the struggle to make articulate a heretofore repressed...
"Would You Really Rather Die Than Bear My Young?": The Construction of Gender, Race, and Species in Octavia E. Butler's "Bloodchild." (Black Women's Culture Issue)
"Did you use the rifle to shoot the achti?" "Yes." "And do you mean to use it to shoot me?" I stared at her, outlined in the moonlight--coiled graceful body. "What does Terran blood taste like to you?" She said nothing. "What are you?"...