Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 6, March 4

A Letter from the Editor
Dear Readers, Game, set, match. Such is the talk around the world concerning war in Iraq, whether one is for it or opposed--or just unsure. Meanwhile, President George W. Bush says he wants peace. But his tough talk comes across to many, especially...
Are Rising Gas Prices Evidence of a Crisis? (Nation in Brief)
"A devastating oil crisis is inevitably threatening the world community." That's the word from Pravda, the Russian newspaper that is about as reliable as our favorite supermarket tabloids. In this case, though, Pravda certainly echoes a lot of mainstream...
Capital-Punishment Canards. (Fair Comment)
In March 1979, a Graterford (Pa.) prison guard was murdered brutally by an inmate. The inmate--at the time he murdered the guard-already was serving a life sentence for the triple murder of two infants and an elderly woman. In 1994, an inmate who...
`Discovering' Jewish Roots Convenient for Democrats. (Fair Comment)
Despite terror warnings, the French, the Germans, the Belgians and the bizarre doings of the "King of Pop" there is a bit of fun to be had in the news these days, and for that we can thank the Democratic candidates for president. Discovering one's...
From Venezuela, a Counterplot: As Agents from Rogue Arab States Pour into Venezuela, Fears Mount That the Chavez Regime Plans to Disrupt Any Prolonged U.S. War in Iraq with an Oil Embargo. (the World: Latin American Threat)
As Washington prepares a high-stakes military venture in the Persian Guff, a growing physical threat is being posed by Iraq, Libya and Iran to the soft underbelly of the United States. Hundreds and possibly thousands of agents from rogue Arab nations...
Justice Looms for Saddam, Cronies: The Bush Team's Postwar Strategy Includes Immediate Trials for Any Iraqi Officers Who Use Weapons of Mass Destruction and Plans to Secure Oil Fields from Sabotage. (the World: War against Iraq)
As Iraq concentrated its forces around Baghdad to protect the regime against a U.S.-led coalition, President George W. Bush revealed in his weekly radio address on Feb. 8 that Saddam Hussein "recently authorized Iraqi field commanders to use chemical...
Marching for Saddam: Many Veterans of Cold War `Peace' Protests Have Become Leaders in the New Pro-Saddam Antiwar Movement, but Their Revolutionary Affiliations and Bizarre Extremist Positions Have Mainstream Americans Wondering Who Might Be Using Whom and for What Purpose Besides Peace
Meet the leaders of the antiwar protests who sought to spread their defense of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein worldwide on Feb. 15-16, going to the streets with a style and message that seemed eerily familiar: * One urged U.S. troops to mutiny and...
Must U.S. Banks Be Kept in Check? U.S. Authorities Must Punish Domestic Banks as Keenly as They Do Foreign Institutions If New Federal Rules Aimed at Curtailing Money Laundering Are to Work, Experts Warn. (the Nation: Money Laundering)
The Treasury Department is set to issue a controversial due-diligence regulation aimed at making it more difficult for mobsters, corrupt foreign officials, terrorists and narco-traffickers to launder their proceeds through the U.S. financial system....
Nader Should Remember His Own Advice. (the Last Word)
The Green Party putatively was organized to save the environment by destroying the human race. Its founder, Herbert Marcuse, a Comintern operative and guru of the Black Panthers and other terrorist groups, had other plans in mind. A "refugee" from...
Others Continue to Take the Hit for Clintons' Corruption. (Fair Comment)
Larry Klayman is one conservative who probably should employ a food taster. He bills his organization, Judicial Watch, as the only real law-enforcement agency in the United States. His fellow conservatives cheered as Klayman filed lawsuit after lawsuit...
Oversight Crisis at Development Banks: Slashed Wrists, Blood-Smeared Offices and Workers Too Terrified to Complain: What Can Be Done to Root out Alleged Corruption at the World's Development Banks? (the World: Multilateral Finance)
Yellow police tape sealed off a sixth-floor office in the exquisite headquarters of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) just two blocks from the White House. The tape barred entry to the room, but it could not contain the horror within, where...
Panic Is near If `the Gold Is Gone': Now That the Much-Hyped `Gold Cartel' Has Been Exposed, Say Some Analysts, the Hitherto Artificially Maintained Price of Gold May Take off like a Rocket. (the World: Precious-Metals Markets)
Gold. It's been called a barbarous relic, and those who focus on its historic role as a standard of value frequently are labeled "lunatic fringe." Given the recent highs in the gold market, it looks like the crazies have been having a hell of a year....
Politics Turn Labor-Intensive. (Washington Diary)
In their frantic attempts to attract more viewers, network-television executives have lowered the standards and plunged the necklines in favor of inanity known as reality programming. But boob-tube bigwigs should beware of hubris. By overestimating...
Proposed Regulation Ignites Power Struggle. (Political Notebook)
Abstruse IRS regulations can at first glance look innocuous to the uninitiated, but more often than not there is more to them than meets the eye. That's certainly the case with pending Reg. 133254-02, now the source of a ferocious, behind-the-scenes...
Putting Faith in the Founding Fathers: WorldNetDaily.com Cofounder Joseph Farah Challenges All Americans to Take Back Their Country by Embracing Traditional Values and Spurning Today's MTV Culture. (Picture Profile)
Joseph Farah is chief executive officer and cofounder of World NetDaily.com, "the Internet largest independent news site," in Farah's words. He's also a veteran journalist, having served such newspapers as the Sacramento Union and the Los Angeles Herald...
Riding to Freedom through Alabama: An Insight Writer Joins a Group of Journalists on a Tour of Historic Sites Remembered from the Civil-Rights Struggle and Observes the Changed Face of the South. (the Nation: Reporter's Notebook)
The morning of Sept. 15, 1963, a bomb went off at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. It was Sunday and the church was packed. Four teen-aged girls--Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carnie Robertson and Cynthia Wesley--died in the blast....
Right & Left: Congressional Votes. (Nation & World)
Senate 1. Shedd Nomination In 1990, when President George H. W. Bush nominated South Carolina University law professor Dennis W. Shedd to the U.S. District Court for South Carolina, the appointment routinely was confirmed by the Senate. But after...
Roller-Coaster Argument Goes Back and Forth, Up and Down. (Nation in Brief)
If you're an activist, it seems like one good way to stir up a fuss is to find something that a lot of people enjoy and denounce it. If the campaign sparks sufficient media attention then, sure enough, some legislator will jump on the bandwagon and...
Struggling to Fix the Secret Service: W. Ralph Basham's Daunting Task Is to Overhaul a Secret Service Culture Tainted and Demoralized by the Clinton Administration's Utter Disregard for Security Procedures. (the Nation: National Security)
As the nation is on the brink of war and the danger of an attack on the homeland mounts, the Bush administration has made an important personnel change that many say was long overdue. It finally has replaced the Clinton appointee who headed the U.S....
Symposium
Q: Should government protect your dinner hour from annoying telemarketers? YES: A house is not a home when surveyors and telemarketers call. BY ROBERT BULMASH To those who complain that a myriad of state and federal do-not-call lists will...
The Bush Economy; Kerry's Character; Keeping Up with Cronkite. (the Insider)
This Bush economy is so bad that U.S. worker productivity rose at a blistering rate of 4.7 percent last year, the best such increase in more than half-a-century. * Amused by grade inflation to provide self-esteem for the left-wing elite in the Ivy...
Will Disaster Doom Future Space Flights? (the Business)
As NASA investigates the cause of the crash of the space shuttle Columbia, American and Russian space scientists warn that the tragedy will negatively impact manned orbital flights. Both countries likely will revise their programs, which are focused...