Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 30, August 16

American Kids Better off, but Poverty Is Persistent
A study by the federal government finds fewer teens are turning to crime and having babies. American children still eat too much junk food, and poverty remains a problem. American children are thriving but there's room for improvement, according...
Cancer Cure Is Elusive, but Therapies Hold Hope
With no magic bullet in sight, scientists are working to control the disease, probing its genetic basis. The latest good news -- cancer deaths are declining for the first time in 18 years. Judah Folkman had no idea he was about to become a media...
Can We Buy Back Our Supercomputer, Please?
They are hoping Congress never finds out -- and in the wake of the damning Cox report on Chinese espionage and the recent flurry over major security lapses at U.S. nuclear labs, it is hardly surprising. But soon officials at the Sandia nuclear laboratory...
China's Beachhead at Panama Canal
Reporting from Balboa, Insight uncovers China's most recent political and economic maneuverings to obtain effective control of the Panama Canal as the U,S, leaves, At the Panama Canal's only Pacific port a dozen huge construction cranes work massive...
Condemn Sin -- and Sinner
A Kansas pastor's brimstone has drawn hellfire from both Christians and homosexuals. The Rev. Fred Phelps, the 69-year-old pastor of Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kan., has boiled his fire-and-brimstone message down to three words: "God hates...
Correspondence
Ritalin Has Helped Many Children Do Well in School I was given a copy of "Doping Kids" [June 28], highlighting the link of psychotropic drugs such as Ritalin to the recent shootings at elementary and high schools. Some of them were taking Ritalin...
Dialing for Drug Dollars
Dogged by AIDS protesters on the campaign trail, Al Gore promised $100 million in funds to combat AIDS, but then his ties to the drug industry led some to cry hypocrisy. With his presidential campaign floundering, Vice President Al Gore turned to...
Eco-Friendly Sport Utility
Environmental group says its `green' vehicle is more economical and just as safe. The Union of Concerned Scientists, or UCS, a liberal environmental-research and advocacy group, has reengineered one of the nation's topselling sport utility vehicles,...
Experiment of Open Admissions Comes Back to Haunt CUNY
To survivors of New York's World War II generation, it was not surprising news: Their legendary, beloved City College and its sister campuses were getting another bad report card. In June the mayor's Advisory Task Force on CUNY gave failing grades...
Fans like Mia, Not MLS
Women's soccer has never been more popular, but the men's game fails to draw. On the same weekend that 90,185 red, white and blue clad fans packed the Rose Bowl for the final of the Women's World Cup, Major League Soccer, or MLS, drew a little less...
Give a Life, Take a Life
The NIH and the HHS have endorsed research using stem cells from human embryos despite a federal law banning such use, raising serious ethical and legal questions. Last fall scientists isolated and cultured stem cells from human embryos for the...
Media Deathwatch of a Favorite Son
All eyes -- willing and unwilling -- have been focused on the death of John E Kennedy Jr., thanks to media saturation that has been rivaling coverage of the death of Princess Diana. The weekend of July 17-18 was eerily familiar to media consumers....
NAACP Suit Can Backfire
The civil-rights organization joins cities and individuals that have sued gun makers. In mid-July, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or NAACP, filed suit against the nation's gun manufacturers for marketing practices...
Not So Common Cents
A penny's life span is 25 years, but many have found early retirement in personal coffee cans and piggy banks -- a situation that has produced another penny shortage. Consumers may not notice it yet, but they're seeing a lot less of Lincoln these...
PBS Wonders What's in a Name
Big Bird has found new material to line his nest: cold cash from left-wing benefactors. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, or CPB, faced congressional scrutiny of its fund-raising practices in mid-July as a bill (HR2384) to reauthorize its...
Playing Doctor in Public Schools
Legislation empowering school-based clinics to diagnose and treat illnesses now is sailing through the California Legislature -- very much at the expense of parental rights. California isn't the first state to create school-based health clinics....
Radical Reform Is the Cure for Flawed Tax System
During the Great Depression, the Department of Agriculture started paying Southern farmers as much as $8 an acre to plant a Japanese vine called kudzu on their land. The vine, which grows at the rate of more than a foot a day, was supposed to prevent...
Run This Up Your DOD Flagpole!
Hot on the heels of this column's assertion that the Defense Department, or DOD, might consider a kinder, gentler approach to its mandatory anthrax-vaccination program, the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Times newspapers jumped on the bandwagon with...
So Here's What $3 Million Buys
The defection of former Republican and temperamental Rep. Michael Forbes of New York to the Democratic Party may be the most lopsided trade since Babe Ruth went to the Yankees. Some say Washington is a funny town. This week was no exception. Twenty-six...
Symposium
Q: Should the United States end the `strategic engagement' with China? Yes: Clinton's policy amounts to a sham peace which undermines U.S. national security. Ten years ago, a frightened Chinese regime that had watched pro-Western demonstrators...
The Last Straw
A career foreign-service officer takes final issue with President Clinton. Foreign Service officer Thomas R. Hutson has left the State Department in disagreement with U.S. policy in the Balkans. For the last four years Hutson was stationed in Yugoslavia,...
Traditional Values Matter Most to Daniels
The head of the Massachusetts Family Institute is on the front line of the culture wars, fighting to maintain the sanctity of marriage and to sustain the family as the basic unit of society. Matt Daniels, president of the Massachusetts Family Institute,...
World Champs
The U.S. women's soccer team triumphed in the World Cup final, and what made it work was not Title IX but determination, hard work and old-fashioned team spirit. As soccer came of age during the 1970s many young players were told the story of Edson...
World Cup Final Reveals Clinton's Primary Colors
When President Clinton extended his recent cross-country poverty tour to watch the United States and China compete in the women's World Cup soccer final in Pasadena, Calif., there was one question on my mind: "Which team is he rooting for?" His...