Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 11, March 18

Beach Bums and Bedouins
Surf like an Egyptian," proclaims a T-shirt in Sharm al-Sheikh, a popular resort on the Red Sea. When it comes to surf, Sharm al-Sheikh runs far behind the North Shore of Oahu, Southern California or many parts of Australia. But when it comes to diving,...
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Beware the Ides of March
Following is the schedule of the remaining primary elections and party caucuses that will select delegates to the Republican National Convention, which will be held Aug. 12-15 in San Diego. The winner will need a majority of the 1,990 delegates, or 996....
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Campaigns Leave Trenches to Wage Airwave War
Deep-pocketed Steve Forbes has launched another season of negative campaigning on television, but candidates and their media advisers still are t n to determine how attack ads play with the public. This election is already starting to break new ground...
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CBS in Denial after Bias Confession
I'm still stunned at the courage CBS reporter Bernard Goldberg showed in his Feb. 13 Wall Street Journal piece denouncing the liberal bias of his own network. "The old argument that the networks and other `media elites' have a liberal bias is so blatantly...
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Clinton Says 'Me Too' as GOP Blasts Immigration
Just north of Tijuana, Mexico, a 14-mile steel fence separates acres of dilapidated shanties from the bustling San Diego metropolis. For years, millions of impoverished Mcidcans have viewed the border barricade as an obstacle in their journey to "El...
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Conservative Blacks Prepare for the Future
Ninety percent of U.S. blacks traditionally vole Democratic, but that could be changing. Polls indicate that 38 percent of African-Americans call themselves conservative and 40 percent consider abortion murder. The media coverage of the 1992 Los Angeles...
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Don't Judge a Library by Its Facade
Today's libraries aren't what they used to be, and neither are their customers," says Linda Wallace, director of the public-information office of the American Library Association, or ALA. Libraries of the nineties might not exactly swing, but they're...
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Follow That Fact!
For those who are not fond of winter, Washington has been a good place of which to steer clear. Some members of Congress gave the wheel a good, sharp spin, veering off to warmer climes of Honolulu and the Bahamas during February. But these were not purposeless...
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Global Warming Is the Scapegoat for Life's Chills
What if the media told you that declining prices across the board were a sign that inflation again was rearing its ugly head? What if they told you that sharp drops in murder and assault rates nationally indicated that crime was on the upswing? Wouldn't...
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Inner Impact of Outer Space
NASA is conducting a neuroscience program to find out just how humans adapt to space - in particular, how astronauts reconfigure their spatial orientation outside the Earth's atmosphere, a high priority during the era of the space shuttle. In space,...
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It's a War to Restore Antibiotics
Aonce formidable arsenal of antibiotics has become the medical equivalent of blunderbusses and Gatling guns. During the last 12 years, the rate of mortality from infectious diseases has risen 58 percent, becoming the third-leading killer of Americans....
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Long March for the GOP
Dole is the strongest entering a grueling month, but Buchanan benefits from a wider field. April is the cruelest month, the poet said. But for Republicans into cruelty, March ought to do nicely, as surviving GOP presidential candidates battle for the...
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Magic Maestro Puts Fun Back into Classical Music
Stephen Simon, also known as the "Magic Maestro,"is proud of his beautiful harpsichord. A one-of-a-kind instrument, it was custom made for the Washington Chamber Symphony's music director. He props up the instrument's lid to unveil a bucolic scene populated...
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Mail Ballot, like Motor-Voter Law, Devalues Privilege of Citizenship
Iowa, New Hampshire and the pile of presidential primaries coming down the road are interesting enough and certainly consequential. But it is out in Oregon where the future is unfolding - the future of no-strain/no-pain citizenship. When voters there...
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Networks Race to the Bank
Stock-car racing finally has arrived in the mainstream, shedding its good-old-boy taint three generations after whiskey-hauling bootleggers invented the sport. Bill France Jr., chairman of the company that owns Daytona International Speedway and a principal...
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Overtime Rules Disregard Realities of the Workplace
The blizzards of 1996 snarled traffic in Washington, closed area schools and presented Arlyce Robinson with two minivacations she didn't want. An office manager at Computer Sciences Corp., Robinson was among thousands of workers who couldn't make it...
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Pope's Vision Has Prevailed over Liberation Theology
Only weeks before Pope John Paul II's triumphant visit to Central America, Jesuit priest Juan Luis Segundo, a founder of liberation theology, died. The movement Segundo helped to found interpreted the Gospel's teaching in light of Marxist class theory,...
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Q: Will OSHA Reforms Endanger American Workers?
In February 1995, Brenda Enfinger, a Republican house wife from North Carolina, delivered a heartfelt plea to Congress. She asked the Republican majority members of the House Economic and Educational Opportunities committee on Workforce Protections,...
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Reefer Madness
We surface after our last dive of the day, a tour of a pristine reef with corals the size of a Volkswagen and fish like the neon of Hong Kong. Basking in the 84-degree waters of the South China Sea, we pull ourselves onto the bamboo outriggers and floated...
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Singles Have Economic Clout, but Many Remain Unsatisfied
Despite a national focus on family values and family-friendly situations, singles are gaining economic clout. "It's like singleness no longer has a limitations," says Susan Deitz, who writes the Los Angeles Times Syndicate column "Single File." "Some...
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Sports Avoid AIDS Panic
Although Tommy Morrison's positive HIV test has raised a cry for mandatory testing of his fellow boxers, it is not likely to prompt testing in other sports. Experts say an athlete has a greater chance of being hit by lightning, developing cancer or crashing...
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Study Lauds Loving Arms of Mothers
Newborns cared for in a hospital nursery cry more and secrete more stress hormone than those who stay with their mothers, a new study shows. "It's nice to begin to have some scientific evidence that keeping mothers and babies together is a good thing,...
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Unmasking the IRA's Leaders
Last month's bombings in London blasted the cease-fire, underscoring the violence and vengeance of the secret army council, the backbone of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. When will the terror end? They are known in Northern Ireland as the "hard...
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