Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 33, September 8

Amateur Linguists Say Language, Not Electrons, Defines Cyberspace
One of the strengths of the English language is its ability to absorb new words. Younger Americans might find it hard to believe, but E-mail and cyberspace weren't always an integral part of everyday vocabulary. But some people intimately connected...
Anti-Male Feminist Dogma Not the Answer to Domestic Abuse
The trouble with ideologues is their simplemindedness. Communists saw a world full of evil: Conniving capitalists arrayed against virtuous, long-suffering proletarians. Fascists saw the world divided between master and inferior races. Modem feminists...
Bigger Doesn't Mean Better ... Men Have More Brain Cells Than Women, but Researchers Aren't Saying More Brain Power
Danish researchers have discovered that men, on average, have 4 billion more brain cells than women. But they are stumped as to what men do with them. The researchers, led by Bente Pakkenberg, a neurologist at Kommune Hospital in Copenhagen, examined...
Consumer Activist Frances Smith Shakes Up Corporate America
As head of a watchdog organization that gives government risk assessment a run for its money, Smith spends her days examining the work of groups such as the Consumer Products Safety Commission. Frances B. Smith is executive director of the Washington-based...
Contributions Taint FDA Independence
What does a cup of coffee have in common with a conjugated estrogen tablet made from horse urine? The common chemistry may be politics. More than 8 million American women take Premarin -- an acronym for the drug's main ingredient, pregnant mares'...
Facts of Life vs. Facts of Love
When David Sherrer talks to teenagers about sexual abstinence, he likes to poke fun at himself and the awkwardness of the topic. "So I laugh, I talk about great sex and I tell this group of 15-year-olds that me and my wife -- we have great sex," he...
Faith Fuels Spiritual Capitalism with a Little Help from Mad Ave
Perhaps the wackiest items at this year's midsummer convention of Christian booksellers were the almond-roca "covenant candy bars." Conceived by Covenant Candies of Newport Beach, Calif., boxes of almond-roca candy were packaged with audiocassettes...
Gilroy Garlic Festival Is Simply Scentsational
Gilroy, Calif., stinks. You can smell the town from the highway that snakes past the suburbs and outlet malls, golden hills and orchards. The scent seeps into your skin and leaves an acrid burning sensation at the back of your throat. The culprit...
Honma Golf Co. Is King of Clubs
Through their quest for precision and devotion to technology, equipment manufacturers long have made golf the world's most expensive sport. But no club maker can touch Japan's Honma Golf Co. Ltd., when it comes to craftsmanship or expense. A full...
Long March Reaches Long Beach
Why Long Beach? Twenty-nine other military bases have closed in California. But the China Ocean Shipping Co., or Cosco, wants the historic U.S. naval base in Long Beach, which scores of America's great warships have called home. The Clinton administration...
New Device Is Helping Sufferers of Parkinson's Lead Normal Lives
The more than 500,000 victims of Parkinson's disease in the United States may be facing a brighter and more manageable future if a medical device recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, is everything its commercial marketers...
New Ideas Take Root in Public-School Reform
A mid the well-justified concerns about the quality of America's education system is ample reason for optimism. In recent years, there has been a renaissance in America's private schools and other encouraging developments for those who are seeking...
No Place (to Learn) like Home School
Homeschooling is mainstream. It is legal in all 50 states, subject to varying regulations, most of which are not onerous. Though still representing only a small fraction of families, homeschooling firmly is on the map of alternatives to the public-school...
President Puts Line-Item Veto Power into Practice
With a historic stroke of the pen on Aug. 11, President Clinton employed the line-item veto, a tool he said was "designed to fight against waste and unjustifiable expenditures, to ensure government works for the public interest, not the private interests."...
Private Vouchers Are Going Public
Graffiti covers a decaying building where armed guards patrol the cinder-block hallways. The inner-city public school is expected to open three weeks late due to fire-code violations, and parents are outraged. This is the deteriorating face of the...
Q: Should Uncle Sam Control U.S. Encryption Technology Exports?
Making strong Commercial encryption widely available indeed is in our country's best interests. It is inevitable that powerful computers, advanced telecommunications and broad electronic networks will form the basis for communications and commerce...
Ten Different Schools of Thought
During the last two decades, there has been no shortage of bad news coming out of academia. Stories about plummeting academic standards at even our best institutions, for example, and about soaring costs that threaten to put college out of the reach...
The Gulf War Mystery
Since Insight first reported that preliminary laboratory tests on a representative sample of Persian Gulf War soldiers found high numbers of antibodies for a synthetic polymer called squalene (see "Sickness and Secrecy," Aug. 25), the calls, letters...
When Special Ops Means Equal Ops
Hollywood is a hoot. Its moguls have traded plot and character, rarely more than epidermally deep, for special effects, with generous doses of graphic sex. As a corollary, a liberal political flavor frequently is stirred into the mash. A goofy...