Insight on the News

Insight on the newspaper is a magazine specializing in General topics.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 29, July 31

1995 - the Democratic Leap Year
During the last nine months, two senators and two representatives have changed their party affiliation to Republican. Out of 535 members of Congress, this might not seem like much, but it has made the 104th Congress the leader in the modern era for lawmakers...
A Bailout for Third-World Bureaucrats
The most notable outcome of the June economic summit in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was the least noted. Finance ministers and leaders of the industrialized nations and Russia agreed to grant frightening new powers to the International Monetary Fund. If the...
Early Method of Photography Was America's Type of Portrait
The great American photographer Abraham Bogardus called daguerreotypes 'the best picture yet made with the camera.' An exhibit at the National Museum of American Art supports his opinion. The invention of the daguerreotype in Paris in 1839 was greeted...
Growing Pains Slow CD-ROMs
Technical glitches and marketing challenges have brought about a period of 'sober reflection.' Even though booksellers say computers won't replace books, they are hedging their bets: Multimedia products - especially CD-ROMs, short for "compact disc,...
Is the Bloc Party over for Democrats?
Pundits debate the future of the Democratic Party - a party at war with itself, devoid of political vision and trapped in a multicultural morass of `racial interest groups, feminists and cultural liberals.' It's summer, according to the calendar - but...
Keep Your Word
If congressional Republicans need a lesson on what happens to a party when it fails to keep campaign promises, they need only take a glance across the Atlantic. Having strayed from the straight and narrow path laid out by former Prime Minister Margaret...
Look: Internet Has Nothing On
To hear politicians talk, the computer age is emerging as an era of direct democracy and legions of people are flocking electronically to get the latest from their legislators and to share a few kind or unkind words. "Americans who enter the information...
New Hope for Ailing Hearts
A promising new drug may help heart patients live longer - if it receives FDA approval. Ernest Seburn drives from his home in rural Pennsylvania every three months to Martinsburg, W. Va., where he hops on a shuttle van headed for a Washington hospital....
Political Behemoths Battle in Brouhaha by the Bay
Four high-profile candidates are turning San Francisco's mayoral campaign into a three-ring circus. But while the city's politics are colorful, it could be the silent sectors that make the difference. He's Boss Tweed in a $1,600 Brioni suit, a legendary...
Politics Pervades Defense Decisions
The Defense Department has told President Clinton what he desperately wants to hear - that approving the Base Closure and Realignment Commission's recommendation to shut down two Air Force maintenance depots would harm national security. By so doing,...
Powerful Agencies Join Endangered Species List
Uncle Sam's regulatory bureaucracies are scrambling to be more cooperative and flexible, but efforts so far have failed to impress the business community or derail proposals moving through Congress. Federal regulation imposes a much greater economic...
Question: Will the Democratic Party Go the Way of the Whigs?
Yes. They lack new ideas to replace old, failed ones. We have seen this before. The Whigs of the 1840s and 1850s were, like modern Democrats, hopelessly divided over basic human freedoms and the role of the federal government. One faction, the "Cotton...
Reich Sees Uncle Sam as Big Daddy
On June 21, 1995, Labor Secretary Robert Reich addressed the National Baptist Convention in San Diego. His topic: family values. Reich predicted that "the next election will be a titanic struggle to define that term." Reich is a close friend of President...
Republicans Rise in Dixie
November's GOP win below the Mason-Dixon line has Southern Democrats running scared. The national Democratic Party is becoming alien to the white South," political analyst Kevin Phillips wrote in his 1969 book, The Emerging Republican Majority. Now...
Stain of Recruitment Sleaze Spreads across Campuses
We've adjusted quite nicely, evidently, to the perversion of intercollegiate athletics. Major-college sports now are professional in all but (legally) paying the young practitioners. There's a cynical subordination of education to the money and recognition...
'World-Class Standards' Are Achieved Abroad - Not Here
Studies show that American students lag behind their overseas counterparts. Business and education groups are advocating that U.S. schools raise standards to remain internationally competitive. States striving to set rigorous academic standards are...