Criminal Justice Ethics

A semiannual journal focusing on ethical issues in criminal justice. Includes articles on topics relating to the police, the courts, corrections, and issues in legal philosophy contributed by philosophers, criminal justice professionals, lawyers and judge

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, Spring

Comments on Risse and Lever
Mathias Risse holds that racial profiling does harm mainly by symbolizing and evoking other harms. He urges discounting (or perhaps not counting at all) such "expressive" harm, lest the harm expressed be counted twice, and argues in particular that...
Racial and Ethnic Profiling
EDITORIAL INTRODUCTION At its three annual divisional meetings, The American Philosophical Association not only provides an umbrella for meetings of many specialized philosophical groups but also sponsors a range of symposia and discussions on topics...
Racial Profiling: A Reply to Two Critics
I Background In an earlier essay, "Racial Profiling," Richard Zeckhauser and I sought to delineate the shape of the moral debate about profiling, to provide conceptual clarification, and to think through some arguments. (1) Since then, Annabelle...
The Situational Prevention of Terrorism: Some Ethical Considerations
The dominant ethical premise of situational crime prevention (that is, the science of reducing opportunities for crime) is respect for the individual. This ethic flows logically from its key assumption about human nature--that individuals are rational,...
What's Wrong with Racial Profiling? Another Look at the Problem
According to Mathias Risse and Richard Zeckhauser, racial profiling can be justified in a society, such as the contemporary United States, where the legacy of slavery and segregation is found in lesser but, nonetheless, troubling forms of racial inequality....
Why We Ought to Be (Reasonable) Subjectivists about Justification
The most difficult problems in criminal theory are generated by dissonance between reality and belief, between the objective facts and the actor's subjective impression of the facts. (1) I Introduction Suppose Alice hits Bert on the head. Prima...