Foreign Policy

This magazine covers global politics and economics in its articles, essays and feature stories.

Articles from No. 169, November-December

After the Fall: What the Lessons of 9/11 Could Teach the World about the Financial Crisis
The global financial meltdown is as surprising and unprecedented as the 9/11 attacks. Beyond that, the two calamities are very different; the financial crash will undoubtedly have broader consequences, hurting more people in more countries. Yet, 9/11...
America's Hard Sell
For more than half a century, the United States ensured that five Big Ideas shaped international politics. Now, as the Big Ideas of the 21st century are formed, just who will corner the new global market of ideology is anyone's guess. One thing is...
Big News and Big Ideas
We normally use this page to highlight some of the big ideas our readers will encounter in the magazine. This time, we are making an exception to share some important news: FOREIGN POLICY has a new home. We are thrilled to announce that on October...
Change Is in the Air
More airlines around the world have gone belly up this year than in the aftermath of September 11. Airlines have simply met their match in the high price of oil. Nothing short of a complete overhaul of the industry--fewer carriers, fewer flights, and...
Cuba's New Revolution
As the Castro regime's grip weakens, could Cuba's cultural establishment finally have some room to breathe again? FP asked prominent Cuban blogger and cultural critic Yoani Sanchez for her take. FOREIGN POLICY: Has the political transition between...
Development 2.0
They've been called the "development mafia"--shadowy experts in obscure disciplines such as drip irrigation and capacity building. But until recently, the tens of thousands of freelance consultants, NGO workers, and aid agency employees who make up...
Development's Great Depression
If your paycheck fluctuated unpredictably from year to year, you'd probably have a hard time planning for the future. That's exactly the predicament many countries that receive international aid face. When Bono throws a series of global concerts or...
Epiphanies: Garry Kasparov
I WAS ASKED at the press conference after a tournament I won in 1997 or 1998, 'What else is left for you in the world of chess?' And I said that I have a son, who was born in 1996, and I want him to see his father win a big chess tournament. At the...
Fashion Forward
When Inditex, the parent company of Spanish retailer Zara, overtook the Gap in sales earlier this year, it won the title of world's largest clothing retailer. It's an improbable achievement for Inditex, which has utterly defied retail orthodoxy since...
Power to the People: Why It's the Poor-Not the Experts-Who Can Best Solve the Food Crisis
Every nongovernmental organization has a mission statement. For example, CARE, one of the world's largest and best-funded NGOS, explains its mission as serving "individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from...
Text for the Cure
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Perhaps the hardest part of fighting contagious diseases is simply getting patients to take their reeds. For tuberculosis, which kills nearly 1.6 million people a year, the drug regimen lasts at least six months and often...
The 2008 Global Cities Index: Cities Bear the Brunt of the World's Financial Meltdowns, Crime Waves, and Climate Crises in Ways National Governments Never Will. So, When Foreign Policy, A.T. Kearny, and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs Teamed Up to Measure Globalization around the World, We Focused on the 60 Cities That Shape Our Lives the Most
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] National governments may shape the broad outlines of globalization, but where does it really play out? Where are globalization's successes and failures most acute? Where else but the places where most of humanity now chooses...
The Catholic Church
From the outside, the Vatican appears resistant to change and tone-deaf to scandal. But, in truth, the world's oldest religious institution bears little resemblance to the mysterious church imagined by conspiracy theorists. Today, Catholicism is attracting...
The Dream Team
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The next American president will confront a host of potential cataclysms: from a virulent financial crisis to a vicious terrorist enemy, nuclear proliferation to climate change. He'll need his country's brightest minds--not...
The FP Quiz: Are You a Globalization Junkie? Test Your Knowledge of Global Trends, Economics, and Politics with 8 Questions about How the World Works
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 1 What percentage of NBA players were born outside the United States? (A) 8 percent (B)16 percent (C) percent 2 Which country has the highest proportion of its population on Facebook? (A) Canada (B) Egypt (C)...
The Lie We Love: Foreign Adoption Seems like the Perfect Solution to a Heartbreaking Imbalance: Poor Countries Have Babies in Need of Homes, and Rich Countries Have Homes in Need of Babies. Unfortunately, Those Little Orphaned Bundles of Joy May Not Be Orphans at All
We all know the story of international adoption: Millions of infants and toddlers have been abandoned or orphaned--aced on the side of a road or on the doorstep of a church, or left parentless due to AIDS, destitution, or war. These little ones find...
This Is Your Brain on War
Could pills one day replace bullets in an army's arsenal? It might sound like science fiction, but thanks to new advances in pharmaceuticals and neuroscience, the next generation of conflict may indeed move from the battlefield to the brain. That's...