Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900

This quarterly journal of historical and critical studies focuses on one of these four fields: the English Renaissance, Tudor and Stuart Drama, Restoration and Eighteenth Century and Nineteenth Century.

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 4, Autumn

Books Received
Adams, Jad. Madder Music, Stronger Wine: The Life of Ernest Dowson, Poet and Decadent. London and New York: I. B. Tauris; dist. exclusively in the US by Palgrave, 2000. Pp. x + 211. $17.95 paper. ISBN 1-86064-714-6. Adams, Kimberly VanEsveld....
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Coleridge's "Christabel" and the Phantom Soul
"Christabel" is Samuel Taylor Coleridge's longest poem, his least revised, the most satisfying to himself as its preface indicates, and his most troubling to readers. It is a poem that can drive readers "mad" or make them feel "stupid." (1) From...
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Eccentricity as Englishness in David Copperfield
In this age, the mere example of nonconformity, the mere refusal to bend the knee to custom, is itself a service. Precisely because the tyranny of opinion is such as to make eccentricity a reproach, it is desirable, in order to break through that...
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George Eliot's Realism and Adam Smith
"Young ladies don't understand political economy," Mr. Brooke explains in Middlemarch, "I remember when we were all reading Adam Smith. There is a book, now." (1) Although references to economics are invariably satirical in George Eliot's fiction,...
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Performing History, Performing Humanity in Mary Shelley's the Last Man
Critics of Mary Shelley's uncanny novel The Last Man (1826) have long recognized this spectacle of mankind's end as part of a "deeply conflicted" critique of romanticism (1)--even a "repudiation of what might simplistically be termed the Romantic...
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Recent Studies in the Nineteenth Century
Inevitably, my fantasies about this reviewing process (serene quiet; leisurely contemplation; pithy condensations of evaluative wisdom) have come up against tougher realities (hectic schedules; huddled masses of books; sinking feelings of arbitrariness)....
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Skirting around the Sex in Mary Tighe's Psyche
"Psyche" is the legend of love; the poem is infused with a rather delightful suppressed eroticism which may have had something to do with its huge success, though Mary herself announced: "I have only pictured innocent love, such love as the purest...
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The Commodification of Time in Wordsworth's "Tintern Abbey"
Marjorie Levinson's influential historical materialist approach to William Wordsworth's "Lines: Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey" addresses the sociohistorical dimensions of the poem, often to the exclusion of formal and aesthetic considerations....
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The Politics of Dirt in Mary Barton and Ruth
Social problem fiction is defined by its dirtiness: transgressively graphic accounts of filth and waste herald a novel's entry into the Condition of England debate. Early examples of the genre spell out the polemical importance of filth, as in the...
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Wordsworth and Current Memory Research
In the last twenty years, important developments have occurred in the study of memory among researchers from different fields of psychology, including cognitive psychology, neuroscience, clinical, personality, and social psychology, among others....
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