The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, January-February

About Face
British plastic surgeon Peter Butler has announced that within the next nine months he intends to perform the first human face transplant. While the ethics of organ transplantation have been debated for decades, face transplants force a whole new set...
"All's Love, Yet All's Law". (Old World News)
Browning may have intended his description to cover all God's work, but it is also an apt summary of what European institutions are doing in medical law and ethics. While there is encouragement to work together in harmony, the major European institutions...
A New Look, Almost. (from the Editor)
Last March, The Hastings Center brought a group of smart and savvy people together for a day to talk about the Hastings Center Report and IRB: Ethics and Human Research, the Center's two serial publications. We were told we face a daunting task, given...
At the Center
Sustenance. If it is on the kitchen table it is up for grabs. That's the unwritten rule. It is with great anticipation that I arrive at the Center, head to the kitchen to fetch my morning coffee, and see what the table bears. More often than not, there...
Body Values: The Case against Compensating for Transplant Organs
Proposals to compensate families for transplantable organs are gathering momentum. The proposals assume that the body is dissociable from the self and can be treated like property. But such a view is out of step with the rest of the culture. The...
Dying of Gallstones. (Case Study)
JG was a thirty-nine-year old Hispanic male with a history of hypertension, sleep apnea, and diverticulitis. He was admitted to the California Medical Center on 29 September 1999 with a reported history of recurring right upper quadrant pain for the...
Dying Patients as Research Subjects. (Another Voice)
In this issue of the Report, Rebecca Pentz and colleagues discuss a new frontier for clinical research ethics--the use of dead and dying patients as research subjects for protocols that cannot ethically be performed on other subjects. Specifically,...
Going to Pot. (at Law)
In several earlier columns, I suggested that judges are usually poorly placed to make good biomedical policy, not least because the law so rarely offers them direct and cogent guidance. Recently, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit proffered...
Health Care Coverage for Not-Yet-Born Children. (Perspective)
On 27 September 2002, the Bush administration issued final rules allowing states to define a fetus as a child eligible for government-subsidized health care under the Children's Health Insurance Program. CHIP does not cover any illegal immigrants and...
Managed Care Organizations and the Rationing Problem
By and large, neither bioethicists nor economists have offered a satisfactory account of how managed care organizations should ration health care. Both disciplines would like to guarantee adequate care to all without defining adequacy. But it cannot...
Personal Genome Sequencing: The Answer to All of Our Worries
I am a worrier with a dilemma. I feel well, seem well, but wonder if, underneath it all, I may be ill. I've had sonograms and mammograms, angiograms and cardiograms, bone scans and CAT scans, glaucoma tests and dental tests, blood pressure tests and...
Physician-Assisted Death. (Letters)
To the Editor: "Vitalism Revitalized: Vulnerable Populations, Prejudice, and Physician-Assisted Death" (HCR, July-August 2002) reviews some of the arguments offered by those opposed to physician-assisted death (PAD). The table of contents' description...
Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Conservative Critique of Intervention. (Essay)
In the course of the years, my views with respect to the morality of physician-assisted suicide have not wavered one bit. I'm opposed to it. Strongly opposed to it. I agree with Karl Barth that "it is for God and God alone to make an end of human life"...
Reproductive Ethics. (Letters)
To the Editor: Thomas Murray's diatribe against procreative liberty ("What Are Families For?" HCR, May-June 2002) misunderstands the work which that concept performs. Consequently he attacks a straw man, missing the great area of commonality of a liberal...
Revisiting Ethical Guidelines for Research with Terminal Wean and Brain-Dead Participants
Some research is too risky to be conducted on anyone with a life expectancy of more than a few hours. Yet under some circumstances, the research can still be carried out by using subjects who are either brain dead or are soon to undergo a terminal...
The Newly and Nearly Dead. (Letters)
To the Editor: In an earlier Hastings Center Report, Jacqueline Glover challenged a clinical research protocol, published elsewhere, using the newly and nearly dead (J. Glover, "Research Using Brain Dead and Nearly Dead Patients," HCR, May-June 2002)....
Two Faces of Health Care Quality Improvement. (Research Notes)
The attention of specialists in health policy has been focused on a very interesting worldwide "movement" in health care called Quality Improvement (QI). It bears watching. QI has the potential to be one of the best things that has happened to American...