The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 6, November-December

AbioCor: An Experiment in Research. (in Brief)
The trials of the AbioCor artificial heart feature an essentially unprecedented strategy for protecting human research subjects. Call it an experiment in human research. For every person who is determined to be eligible to enter these trials at any...
A Shot in the Arm for Public Health? (Capital Report)
Perhaps the greatest success story in public health is the reduction of infectious diseases through the use of vaccines. Routine immunization has eradicated smallpox internationally and led to the near elimination of polio and other infectious diseases....
Bush's Stem Cell Compromise: A Few Mirrors? (in Brief)
It has been said by some that the sign of a good policy decision is that it leaves no one completely happy. If so, then President Bush's August 9 announcement concerning federal funding of stem cell research will be remembered as policymaking's finest...
Catholic Teaching on Prolonging Life: Setting the Record Straight: Although Many Do Not Seem to Recognize It
Catholic teaching on prolonging life: setting the record straight: although many do not seem to recognize it, the half-millenium-old tradition of Catholic teachings on providing care at the end of life offers a nuanced, carefully balanced doctrine,...
Heroic Measures: Just Bioethics in an Unjust World: In Its Excitement over the Quandries Posed by Biotechnology, Bioethics Is in Danger of Neglecting Basic Health Care Needs. What Is Needed Is an Understanding of Ethics That Emphasizes Responsibility to Others Rather Than Rights
Bioethics as a field lives always in the haunting past of medicine, in the querulous present, and in the troubling and intriguing future, thinking always of implications, always of causality. This article is aimed toward a different task--about what...
Procreation and Punishment. (at Law)
In 1942, in the landmark case of Skinner v. Oklahoma, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an Oklahoma eugenics law that authorized involuntary sterilization for individuals convicted of three or more "felonies involving moral turpitude." (1) The Court...
Public Health Ethics-More Urgent Than Ever. (at the Center)
Public Health Ethics--More Urgent than Ever. The tragic events of 11 September have altered our priorities and changed the context within which we work. Issues at the forefront last summer have been placed on the back burner, and new questions dominate...
The Foundation of Christian Bioethics. (Review: Now, the Real Foundations of Bioethics)
The Foundations of Christian Bioethics. By H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. Lisse/Abingdon/Exton, Penn./Tokyo: Swets & Zeitlinger Publishers, 2000. 438 pp. $39.95. The Foundations of Christian Bioethics is Tristram Engelhardt's long-awaited sequel...
The Limits of Dispute Resolution. (Case Study)
Mr. D. was a seventy-five-year-old man with a history of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, renal insufficiency, and coronary artery disease associated with frequent episodes of congestive heart failure. He was brought to the emergency...
The Personal Touch. (from the Editor)
An extensive and accumulating literature holds that morality is rooted at bottom in the dynamics of personal relationships, not in general claims about rationality, happiness, or human flourishing. Much of this literature has focused on the notion...
Trust and the Ethics of Health Care Institutions: Though Trust Is Essential to Relationships between People, Including That between Patient and Clinician, Its Role in Organizational Ethics Is Largely Unexplored. Nonetheless, Trust Is Also Ideally a Part of the Relationship between Patient and Health Care Institution, Both Because It Is Desirable in and of Itself, and Because It Makes for Better Medical Care
It is widely acknowledged that trust is a vital component of and basis for relationships between clinicians and patients. These interpersonal trust relationships have moral content--fidelity to trust is morally praiseworthy, betrayal of trust morally...
Van Rensselaer Potter: The Original Bioethicist. (in Memoriam)
Van Rensselaer Potter, who died 6 September 2001, was the first and foremost bioethicist. The man who coined the term "bioethics" in 1970 died peacefully in the presence of his family, shortly after his ninetieth birthday. His conception of bioethics...