The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 3, May-June

At the Center
A Staff Writer this Way Comes. It was a cold and ice-bright morning in February' the first time I found myself within view of the House of Gordon, where I was to have my first interview for the positions of staff writer and associate editor. The previous...
CPR in Hospice. (Case Study)
Gerald Washington is a seventy-three-year-old male with end-stage pancreatic cancer. Ten years ago, he suffered severe cardiac problems and was resuscitated twice, but he has been in reasonably good health since then until his diagnosis of cancer....
Eve Redux: The Public Confusion over Cloning. (Essay)
As any well-informed newspaper reader knows by now, the white-robed prophet Rael (nee Claude Vorilhon) is a soft-spoken, French-born, Canadian-based apostle of cloning technology who claims to have been conceived by a human mother and a space alien....
Human Cloning and Human Dignity: The Report of the President's Council on Bioethics. (Essay)
In July 2002, the President's Council on Bioethics (PCB) issued its first report, Human Cloning and Human Dignity. The PCB's selection of this first topic was not surprising, in view of the lack of a federal ban on reproductive cloning (what the PCB...
Human Cloning and the FDA. (at Law)
In the human cloning debate, virtually everyone agrees on one point: the need to protect children and women from undue risk. Any children produced through cloning, as well as women supplying oocytes and gestating cloned embryos and fetuses, would be...
It's a Small World after All: Ethics and the Response to SARS
As I sit writing this, I have a scratchy throat, watery eyes, a faint headache and the beginnings of congestion in my head--maybe even a slight fever. Oh, and I've been on an airplane more than a few times over the past month. So my first worry isn't...
No Wonder Research Ethics Is Confusing. (from the Editor)
The lead story in this issue of the Hastings Center Report claims that much of what has been written about the ethics of human subjects research is mistaken. According to Franklin Miller and Howard Brody, much of the literature on research ethics fails...
Putting Medicaid at Risk. (Perspective)
President Bush has proposed converting Medicaid into a block grant to states. He wants to free the state-run program from close federal supervision and give states substantial programmatic flexibility if they agree to take a predetermined lump sum...
RVUs Blues: How Should Docs Get Paid?
An earlier version of this article was delivered as the incoming president's address at the 2002 annual conference of the American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities. One of my favorite books about doctors is John Berger's A Fortunate Man....
Surplus Embryos, Nonreproductive Cloning, and the Intend/foresee Distinction
One interesting view to emerge from the stem cell debate is that while it is sometimes permissible to use human embryos for stem cell derivation, it is wrong to create them just for this purpose. Public figures such as Senator Bill Frist and Dr. Charles...
Therapeutic Misconception in the Ethics of Clinical Trials. (A Critique of Clinical Equipoise)
The Hypericum Depression Trial Study Group published in 2002 the results of a randomized trial comparing hypericum (St. John's Wort), sertraline (Zoloft), and placebo in the treatment of major depression. (1) In the study, funded by the National Institutes...
Therapeutic Obligation in Clinical Research. (Another Voice)
In this issue of the Report, Franklin Miller and Howard Brody argue that clinical equipoise, a concept viewed by many as foundational to the ethics of clinical research, ought to be abandoned. They mount both historical and philosophical arguments...