The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 2, March-April

Case Studies: C-Section for Organ Donation
This case forces us to question the Kanfian principle that human beings Must never be treated solely as a means for the good of others. It also further complicates the already difficult questions surrounding the treatment of infants with anencephaly....
China: Moral Puzzles
Resource allocation, euthanasia, procreation, AIDS-these familiar issues of Western bioethics seem to know no geographical boundaries, as the following collection of articles by authors in the People's Republic of China, Thailand, and the Philippines...
DNA Fingerprinting in the Twilight Zone
It the close of the last decade, Science announced its intention to counteract the symbolization of years by people by naming a "Molecule of the Year." Nor is this irony. Science's editor, Daniel E. Koshland, Jr., asserts that "our present standard...
Ethics Committees and Cost Containment
Health care institutions are under strong pressures to contain costs. Should ethics committees within those institutions assist in such efforts? If not, can ethics and economics be separated that neatly? The complexity of this issue derives in part...
HIV and Pregnancy
Recently in a hospital in an English provincial town where drugs, HIV infection, and prostitution are problems associated with a distant world of fast city life, a young woman encountered special difficulties with her first pregnancy. Clearly there...
How Many Hours?
In July 1989 the New York State Department of Health enacted regulations that limited hours worked by residents, increased supervision by attending staff, and augmented ancillary services. The plan, proposed by the Bell Commission, has radically transformed...
Is There a Place for Lawyers on Ethics Committees? A View from the Inside
The value of multidisciplinary participation in institutional ethics committees is well accepted. The inclusion of lawyers, however, has been the subject of ongoing debate. As in-house hospital counsel who have actively participated in the work of...
Literature Up-Date
A new Joumal, HEC Forum, which focuses on ethical and legal issues that institutional ethics committees face, is designed to serve as a practical resource for ethics committees, rather than a scholarly academic journal. To this end, its authors are...
No Decision on Cruzan?
The U.S. Supreme Court might not rule on the so-called "right to die" after all. New bills pending in the Missouri legislature would permit the removal of a feeding tube from thirtytwo-year-old Nancy Cruzan, who lies in a persistent vegetative state,...
On Being Ethical in Unethical Places: The Dilemmas of South African Clinical Pathologists
Prejudice and conflict are problems in many societies, but only in South Africa is racial discrimination entrenched as state policy. Apartheid laws ensure the dominance of white South Africans by denyng black groups effective political and economic...
Parental Responsibility and the Infant Bioethics Committee
Baby Boy G was delivered prematurely at thirty-four weeks' gestation by cesarean section. He weighed four pounds (1800 grams) at birth and required a ventilator during his first five days of life due to immature lungs. At that time, he developed abdominal...
Science as an Ethical Vocation
In his classic essay, "Science as a Vocation," Max Weber observed: "Natural science gives us an answer to the question of what we must do if we wish to master life technically. It leaves quite aside ... whether we should and do wish to master life...
Thailand: Refining Cultural Values
Today Thailand is frequently referred to as one of the newly industrialized countries (NICS). The present ambition of Thai policy-makers is to move the country toward realizing its economic and social potential. The concern for rapid development affects...
The Adolescence of Ethics Committees
Ethics committees, which were born some ten to fifteen years ago, are now entering their adolescence. And they are engaging in some of the tentative exploration typical of that stage of growth. They know what they are expected to do-case consultation,...
The Ethics of Home Care: Autonomy and Accommodation
Preface In the last decade, home care has been of the fastest growing sectors in our health care system. For the frail elderly in particular, home care agencies are now a major source of medical, nursing, and social services. As medicare's prospective...
The Heart, the Gut, and Brain Death in Japan
Determining death by brain-centered criteria is not officially accepted in Japan. Although Japanese professionals favor a brain death standard, the opinion of the public is split. According to a poll carried out in 1988 by the Asahi paper, one of Japan's...
The Philadelphia Story
The Policies and Research Subcommittee of the Delaware Valley Ethics Committee Network (DVECN) has completed its first major project, the development of Sample Policy Packets. These are designed to provide an educational resource for our members who...
The Philippines: A Public Awakening
The Philippines could be the only country in the entire world that has a mandate for the protection of the life of the unborn" written into its constitution. The new constitution of 1987 provides that: "The state recognizes the sanctity of family...
What about the Family?
We are beginning to recognize that the prevalent ethic of patient autonomy simply will not do. Since demands for health care are virtually unlimited, giving autonomous patients the care they want will bankrupt our health care system. We can no longer...
What Price Parenthood?
Current reproductive technology challenges us to think seriously about social values surrounding childbeating. Thoughtful discussion must combine careful attention to the experience of pursuing parenthood by technological means with principled reflection...