The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 3, May-June

Animals in Science: The Justification Issue
At the heart of the wide-ranging and seemingly unending controversy over the use of animals in biomedical science, whether in basic or applied research, toxicity testing, drug production, or education, is one burning question: Are we humans ethically...
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Beyond the Pill?
It has been twenty-five years since the landmark Supreme Court decision in Griswold v. Connecticut brought contraceptive use under a constitutionally protected fight to privacy. However, according to a recent publication by the Committee on Population...
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Case Studies: The Price of Silence
Mrs. S, at age forty-five, has just been told dud she has Huntington disease, following a workup--including CAT scanning of the brain-after she developed abnormal body-jerking movements. Huntington disease (HD) is a disorder of genetic origin, appearing...
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Critical Anthropomorphism, Animal Suffering, and the Ecological Context
Judgments about animal suffering are of central importance in evaluating scientific protocols. To make such judgments we must confront a set of problematic practical questions: How are we to predict the effects on animals of particular scientific protocols?...
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Ethical Review and Te Animal Care and Use Committee
The use of animals in research, teaching, and testing in America began to grow in die late 1800s. In response, animal welfare groups began to protest such use and promoted legislation to restrict or stop what they perceived to be cruel and unnecessary...
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Ethical Theory and the Moral Status of Animals
Members of an institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) spend much of their time inspecting laboratories and care facilities, and studying regulations. Yet one of their most important duties is to grapple with ethical problems: whether specific...
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Exile and PVS
Why do we match the persistent vegetative state with what we frankly should call the persistent medicative state-a relentless use of artificial nourishment and other treatments to perpetuate unconscious existence? Given a patient's prior request, physicians...
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Future Directions
In this Special Supplement, we have tried to emphasize the points of consensus that the project participants of "The Ethics of Animal Experimentation and Research" in fact reached: that the use of animals in science involving animal suffering or harm...
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Healing-Killing Conflicts: Medical Ethics and the Death Penalty
Moral opposition by medical professionals to participation in the process of sentencing for capital crimes, including refusals to provide medical treatment, may compromise the integrity of the legal process. The most aggravated forms of homicide...
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Introduction. the Troubled Middle in Medias Res
The present public debate over using animals for human purposes shows no signs of abating. If anything, whether the issue is the use of animals in science, the wearing of furs, hunting and fishing for sport, or eating animals raised on modem "factory"...
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One Flew over the Supreme Court
It is too soon to tell how seriously to take Soviet historian Roy A. Medvedev's statements that "Gorbachev's taking a lot from the American Constitution," and that the U.S. "can take some pride in setting an example for us [the Soviets]." (1) But...
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Policy Issues in the Use of Animals in Research, Testing, and Education
Public policy about the use of animals in research in the United States acknowledges that animal experimentation is a needed part of science and that it must be conducted in accord with certain humane standards. National policies require registration...
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Publishing Biomedical Research: Roles and Responsibilities
Authors, reviewers, and editors have critical responsibilities to ensure the validity and utility of published biomedical research. Publication of the results of biomedical research in scientific journals is not a mere formality or epiphenomenon in...
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Selective Termination of Pregnancy and Women's Reproductive Autonomy
The "demand" for selective termination of pregnancy is a socially constructed response to prior medical interventions in women's reproductive processes, themselves dependent on cultural views of infertility. The development of techniques for selective...
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The Burden of Decision
The good reasons for judicial intervention in some bioethics cases do not mean that physicians, administrators, and families should routinely seek to shift the burden of decision to the courts. Over the past three decades the courts have been a major...
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The Fetus's Mother
A logically necessary condition for being a mother is having a child. If a woman does not have or has never had a child, then she cannot be a mother. This is not to make any presuppositions about what constitutes being a child; if "mother" is to be...
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The Last Remaining Way to Die
In the November 1989 issue of Chest, researchers at the University of California, San Diego reported progress in understanding how people die in their sleep. A study of sleep patterns in 233 elderly nursing home residents found a high prevalence of...
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The Nuremberg Code and Medical Research
On December 4th and 5th, 1989, the Law, Medicine and Ethics Program of Boston University School of Medicine and Public Health sponsored a symposium entitled "The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code: Relevance for Modern Medical Research." The goal...
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The Offensive-Defensive Distinction in Military Biological Research
Should medical researchers not participate in military biological research? The argument for "no participation " falsely assumes there is no practical and moral distinction between offensive and defensive military biological research. In April 1989,...
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We've Come a Long Way, But
Does gender bias impede doctors' communication with women? Whatever the situation in individual cases, the committee on Women's Health Issues of the Ontario Medical Association finds it still widely perceived that physicians do not take women's concerns...
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