The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 1, January

An Uncertain Future for Assisted Suicide
The defeat of Proposal B by Michigan voters on November 3 was not a surprise. Merian's Friends, the group sponsoring this measure to legalize physician-assisted suicide for the seriously ill, was outmatched in funding and organization. Citizens for...
Bioethics, Biology, and the Biosphere
Fragmented Ethics and "Bridge Bioethics" The Report's editorial mandate is both to examine issues of current importance and to invite bioethics to broaden the range of issues it probes. Thus along with articles exploring the relationship between...
Empirical Research on Informed Consent
An Annotated Bibliography Obtaining the informed consent of patients and subjects is now an expected part of clinical medicine and research. In concert with strong theoretical justifications, an array of laws, regulations, court cases, policy statements,...
Implantable Brain Chips? Time for Debate
Today's mail brings a catalog advertising a sweatshirt emblazoned with the slogan, In my next life I'm going to have more memory installed." Most of us can relate to this desire. As it happens, it might not be so farfetched. Computer visionaries predict...
In the Literature
Aronowitz, Robert A. Making Sense of Illness: Science, Society, and Disease. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998. $29.95 cloth, $17.95 paper. * The author describes the evolution of the meaning of disease by analyzing the "Type A" hypothesis...
Justification by Faith
In June 1997 a sixteen-year-old girl named Shannon Nixon began to feel ill. Her parents belonged to the Faith Tabernacle Church, one of a number of American sects which believe that illness should be treated spiritually rather than medically. Accordingly,...
Making Responsible Decisions
An Interpretive Ethic for Genetic Decisionmaking Recently, it seems that virtually every week some new genetic discovery is heralded in the New York Times as the latest medical breakthrough and great hope for humanity. With each new genetic correlation,...
Medical Screening and the Value of Early Detection
When Unwarranted Faith Leads to Unethical Recommendations One of the basic principles of medical ethics is Primum non nocere, or "At least do no harm." One of the basic claims of this essay is that many of our current screening practices are inconsistent...
Researchers Close in on Primordial Stem Cells
In the first week of November 1998, two teams of researchers announced that they had cultured human primordial stem cells, suggesting, among other potential medical benefits, the possibility of an endless supply of transplantable tissues and organs....
Research Notes
The ongoing shortage of donor organs for transplantation and the emergence of new tools in molecular biology have combined to rekindle interest in the prospects of using organs from nonhuman species to meet the needs of critically ill human patients....
Resistance and Refusal
A forty-one-year-old woman, profoundly retarded and non, verbal, is a resident in a long term care facility. Three and half years ago, Ms. R began resisting the yearly routine gynecological examination. For the first two years, she was allowed to skip...
The Ecomedical Disconnection Syndrome
The Hastings Center's contributions to medical bioethics are deservedly celebrated. For example, their international project The Goals of Medicine: Setting New Priorities is an ambitious effort to redirect the future course of medicine.[1] Their recent...
Unity in Diversity
We have known for years that e ability of research ethics committees to provide adequate protection of human research subjects in the United Kingdom is very varied. It has been argued that they might do their job better were there to be legislation...