The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 1, January

Alternative & Complementary Medicine: What's a Doctor to Do?
Surveys indicate that forms of alternative medicine are increasingly widely used by patients; the NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (along with the National Cancer Institute) is conducting research on a variety of alternative...
America as Pattern and Problem
Since the days of Tocqueville, foreign observers have seen America as both a pattern and a problem. They still do, and in ways that illuminate the way law deals with bioethical issues both here and abroad. America was long exceptional in having a written...
At the Center
Kansas on My Mind. Last summer I took a sabbatical from The Hastings Center's Humans and Nature Program to do some primary fieldwork. I went fishing, spending my time amidst family and mountains, rivers and streams, native western trout and world-traveling...
Beneficence Today, or Autonomy (Maybe) Tomorrow?
Monica, a forty-nine-year-old divorced mother of two children in their early twenties, was admitted to the hospital for acute respiratory insufficiency on a Friday evening. She is a heavy smoker and had experienced dyspnea for several weeks previously,...
Centering Bioethics
In Mortal Choices Ruth Macklin tells a common--or perhaps one might even say archetypal--tale of "entering" the field of bioethics: When I reflect on how I came to work in this field, I can only condude that it resulted from a happy coincidence...
From the Editor
In volume 19 (September-October 1989) of the Hastings Center Report, Howard Brody counseled physicians to make their reasoning about treatment recommendations "transparent" to patients. As we begin volume 30, it seems not a bad idea to make the Report's...
"If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It"
In the last year of the millennium, the New World very nearly caught the Old World napping. We had known of the debate about the ethics of medical research in less developed countries but had not taken seriously the idea that for many Americans the...
Moral Teachings from Unexpected Quarters
Lessons for Bioethics from the Social Sciences and Managed Care Consider the following sketch of how bioethics relates to health care, its major object of study, and to the social sciences, one of its chief allies. Bioethics's job is to assess in...
Research Notes
Relational Dimensions of Care Despite the presumed importance of "the doctor-patient relationship" it is not clear that there is a single, generic relationship between patient and clinician. Patients and physicians, nurses, and other caregivers...
The Contributions of Sociology to Medical Ethics
Medical ethics has not always been friendly territory for the social sciences; at least a few sociologists who have wandered across disciplinary borders for a tour report back on unfriendly natives.[1] I should acknowledge, from the first, that I am...
The Facts about Tube Feeding: What Benefit?
On the theme that more evidence could make for better ethics: Thomas Finucane and colleagues argue in the 13 October 1999 issue of JAMA that the argument for providing artificial nutrition to patients with advanced dementia rests on premises never...
Universalism & Particularism
Fighting to a Draw About all most people know of the American philosopher George Santayana is that he once said those who forget history are doomed to repeat it. He was only half right. Even those who remember history are probably doomed to repeat...
Why Gender Matters to the Euthanasia Debate
On Decisional Capacity and the Rejection of Women's Death Requests The euthanasia debate has typically addressed the tension between patient autonomy and physician obligations. Where physician-assisted suicide and active euthanasia are concerned,...