National Defense

National Defense is a magazine specializing in Defense topics.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 550, September

$15B Effort to Scrap Poison Weapons Targeted for Cuts
The United States plans to destroy all of its 30,000 tons of chemical weapons by 2007. But a senior Pentagon official in charge of the project warns that waning congressional support and delays in awarding contracts could slow down the effort. The 2007...
Air Force 'Mobility Study' to Estimate Global Airlift Demands
The Air Force is reviewing its current and future demands for tactical and strategic cargo aircraft. The goal is to set spending priorities for the next several years, said the service's chief of staff, Gen. Michael E. Ryan. "We are going through a large...
Anti-Bio Terrorism Training Needs Realistic Simulations
Out of the entire spectrum of weapons of mass destruction-chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear-biological agents pose some of the most daunting challenges to defense planners. The lethality of biological agents potentially is orders of magnitude...
Certification Software Saves Time, Money
Many small disadvantaged businesses are finding that trying to obtain formal certification from the Small Business Administration (SBA) is an arduous process, for which they have neither the time nor the money to partake, said industry officials. In...
Chemical, Biological Defense Program Runs 'Hot & Cold'
The U.S. military services are stepping up efforts to deploy advanced detectors and warning devices to protect troops from chemical and germ warfare. The program, nevertheless, suffers from fluctuations in funding and inter-service disagreements, according...
'Cold War' Series: Window to Past and Future
There is good news for those who missed the first broadcast of CNN's stunning series, "Cold War." The 24-part video package can be purchased directly from the network. It is well worth seeing. Cold War is, on the one hand, a recapitulation of the rivalry...
Combat Bridges Shoulder 70-Ton Tanks
Army to upgrade tactical bridges; contractor selection under way Two contractor teams are pitching competing portable bridges to the U.S. Army during ongoing tests at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. They are vying for an upcoming contract award to build...
Commanders Told to Report False Alarms
Army leader offers `lessons learned' from Gulf War illness fiasco After nearly a decade of investigations into suspected exposure to chemical agents by U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf, the Pentagon plans to rewrite the rulebook for commanders. The revised...
Congress to Iron out Allocation Conflict
Congress returns after Labor Day to an extremely heavy schedule. Remaining appropriation bills, the conference report on the Defense Authorization Act and tax legislation all require attention before the planned congressional adjournment in October....
Crafty Enemy Outwits Smart Bombs?
Since the end of the air war over Kosovo three months ago, there has been continuing debate at the Pentagon about the so-called "lessons learned." But there is, in particular, one lesson that has caused much frustration among U.S. defense officials....
Flurry of Association Activities Prompted by Critical Government Policy Initiatives
As the debate on the globalization of the industrial base gains intensity at the Pentagon and in corporate boardrooms, it is important for NDIA's membership to know about a number of significant policy actions affecting our industrial base. Sales of...
Flying at High G's Alters Pilot's Perception of Colors
Recent Air Force studies have found that increased gravitational forces, or "g forces," cause pilots' eye-level blood pressure to drop. Researchers believe this might distort the perception of colors on cockpit display panels. Scientists used the Dynamic...
Global Defense Market Shapes U.S. Policy on Industry Mergers
Pentagon officials at the highest echelons are endorsing the pursuit of cooperative ventures between U.S. and foreign defense contractors. They claim this is in the best interest of allied governments, because their military forces need to be modernized....
Joint Strike Fighter Cannot Replace F-22, Says Air Force Chief
If Congress cancels the Air Force F-22 next-generation air superiority fighter, the service will review its goals and priorities for another key program, the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). The JSF is scheduled to replace the Air Force F-16 fighter in about...
Kosovo Air War Fuels Cries for European Defense Unity
Europe's defense industrial base is collapsing rapidly, some U.S. defense industry experts assert. They predict relief will come only if the members of the European Union (EU) decide to give up some autonomy in defense-related matters. The EU is a treaty-based...
Lessons Learned in Kosovo Shape Future Weapon Buys
Quintessential U.S. defense strategy and the decisive weapon systems that underpin it are being forged by diverse threats abroad and competing domestic priorities at home. Overseas commitments in the Balkans, the Persian Gulf and Korea, particularly,...
'Less Weight' Is the Mantra for Infantry Weapon Makers
The U.S. Army wants to equip its infantry forces with advanced firearms that perform better but weigh less than existing weapons. The service also wants its suppliers to make the equipment less costly. This was the message heard by industry representatives...
Local Bomb Squads Bolster Response to Nuclear Terror
The Energy Department is working on various initiatives aimed at helping the U.S. government respond to acts of nuclear terrorism. The department's Nuclear Emergency Search Team (NEST) recently was reorganized in order to support rapid response to an...
Pentagon Makes It Easier for Small Firms to Get Contracts
Attracted by a defense budget of $267 billion, many small companies would like to do business with the Pentagon, but are put off by the formidable complexities of dealing with the largest bureaucracy in the federal government. Recognizing that they have...
Pentagon Seeks to Boost Public Confidence in Y2K Readiness
With roughly 90 days until the end of the year, the Pentagon is assuring the public that military operations will continue unaffected by the highly publicized Y2K date change problem predicted to occur at midnight on December 31. Reporters recently were...
Readers Forum
On Executive Compensation The May/June 1999 issue of National Defense included a commentary by Ira Weinberg, entitled "Compensation Policy Needs Explanation: Survey Reveals Ambiguities in How the Law Measures Executive Pay." I believe the article contains...
Small Businesses Getting More Assistance
Recently enacted laws aid women, minorities, disadvantaged entrepreneurs Companies that qualify as small businesses-especially those owned by women, minorities or the disadvantaged-are getting new help in raising capital and coping with Y2K and natural...
Tank Trainers Move to High-Tech Ground
Army integrates old and new simulators for realistic combat drills There was once an old farmer who felt that grain for his mule was costing too much. He decided to save money by mixing in a little sawdust with the grain. The mule didn't seem to notice,...
Unhappy Foreign Customers Request Arms Sales Reform
The foreign military sales (FMS) program-a Defense Department operation that manages sales of defense equipment, services and training to allied governments-is becoming a source of increasing dissatisfaction for U.S. industry and government customers...
U.S. Antitank Weapons Could Replace Landmines, Study Says
A retired Army general who opposes the U.S. government's position on the use of antipersonnel landmines says recent military and peacekeeping operations in the Balkans offer a stark example of why mines should be banned. The Clinton administration declined...
U.S. Deployments Derailed by Threat of Mass Terror?
The ability of key military units in the United States to deploy quickly to hotspots worldwide could become "significantly impaired" as a result of chemical attacks, according to a Pentagon study. In order to demonstrate that critical points of embarkation...
Washington Pulse
SPREAD TOO THIN? The war over Kosovo has prompted many questions in the minds of key congressional leaders, who view the conflict as proof that U.S. forces may be overstretched. For that reason, Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John Warner, R-Va.,...
WID Reaches out to the Regions
WID's new Vice President Marie Danco, from TRW, is designing a new outreach plan with the assistance of NDIA President Lawrence E Skibbie. The objective of this effort is to identify ways in which WID can develop its membership by aligning with other...