National Defense

National Defense is a magazine specializing in Defense topics.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 602, January

Army Catching Up with Demand for Track
Scrambling to meet a colossal surge in demand for armored vehicle track in Iraq, the Army's Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command says it will complete a crash program to expand production capacity by March 2004. "The trends are positive," said...
Army Shifting Aviation Focus from Unmanned to Manned
The role of Army helicopters in Iraq as combat workhorses has bolstered the notion that rotary-wing aircraft, for most missions, are unlikely to be replaced by unmanned vehicles. The upshot is a renewed emphasis on long-term investments in research...
Army Wants Trucks That 'Survive' Combat
Competition under way for $42 million concept technology demonstrationRepeated attacks on truck convoys in Iraq have prompted the Army to revisit its requirements for future logistics vehicles. Notably, the conflict challenged the traditional notions...
Army Wants Trucks That 'Survive' Combat: Competition under Way for $42 Million Concept Technology Demonstration
Repeated attacks on truck convoys in Iraq have prompted the Army to revisit its requirements for future logistics vehicles. Notably, the conflict challenged the traditional notions of tracks as support vehicles that stay out of the line of fire. Many...
Canadian Army Snipers Gain from Afghanistan Experience
Drawing from their combat experience in Afghanistan, Canadian Army snipers are taking steps to improve their organization and equipment. Canada has approximately 2,000 soldiers in Afghanistan, as part of the North Atlantic Treaty, Organization stabilization...
Comanche Review Shrouded in Secrecy
The aircraft that once was labeled "the quarterback" of the Army's future force faces an uncertain fate.The chief of staff of the Army, Gen. Peter J. Schoomaker, appointed a "review team" that met in recent months to discuss the future of Army aviation,...
Contractors Competing for Chem-Bio Defense Dollars
A small credit-card size device that can be installed on unmanned drones could be used to detect airborne nerve and blister agents. The technology was developed at the Sandia National Laboratory, in New Mexico, and is being marketed by Lockheed Martin....
Corporate Self-Governance Remains an Imperative
The ethics-related issues that have put the defense industry on the front pages in recent weeks obviously have prompted concerns among business leaders. As the industry prepares to deal with the long-term implications of these latest developments,...
DARPA Sketches Futuristic 'Virtual Schoolhouse'
Although the technology does not yet exist, DARPA believes the concept can workThe Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is trying to solve a chronic problem for the military services: the shortage of training facilities and the difficulties in making...
DARPA Sketches Futuristic 'Virtual Schoolhouse': Although the Technology Does Not Yet Exist, DARPA Believes the Concept Can Work
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is trying to solve a chronic problem for the military services: the shortage of training facilities and the difficulties in making time to train. Under a program called DARWARS, the agency is seeking...
Editor's Corner
The U.S. Navy is taking a leading role in the enforcement of a Bush administration initiative, aimed at curtailing the spread of weapons of mass destruction around the world. The Navy is preparing to tackle increasingly more complex "maritime interdiction"...
Editor's Corner
The U.S. Navy is taking a leading role in the enforcement of a Bush administration initiative, aimed at curtailing the spread of weapons of mass destruction around the world. The Navy is preparing to tackle increasingly more complex "maritime interdiction"...
Fast Cargo Ships Could Halve Trans-Atlantic Trips
A Philadelphia-based ship design firm plans to build a high-speed cargo vessel that can cut trans-Atlantic travel time in half.FastShip Inc. is hoping to receive a contract to build four monohull ships. The firm already has raised $2 billion, but still...
Industrial Base Study to Be Briefed in 2004
The Center for Strategic and International Studies plans to brief senior Pentagon officials on its most recent research work on the defense industrial base. CSIS is hopeful that this study, unlike many other studies produced in recent decades, will...
Marine Vehicle Upgrades Reflect Combat Demands
Immediate needs for equipment repairs and upgrades--rather than long-term plans for transformation--are the dominant forces in Marine Corps vehicle programs today, officials said. The focus is on fixing war-torn equipment and accelerating programs...
Military Bases at Sea: No Longer Unthinkable
Staging a military campaign the size of Operation Iraqi Freedom entirely from ships at sea--with no access to land bases--would seem inconceivable to most defense planners. Nonetheless, the notion of "sea basing" forces has gained momentum at the...
Military Vehicles Could Benefit from Hybrid Electric Engines
Hybrid trucks that blend electric motors with internal combustion engines promise fuel efficiency, as well as plentiful, stealthy sources of electrical power for battlefield sensors, weapons, and command and control systems. The National Automotive...
More Attention Urged for Maritime Defense
The United States should rely more on naval reserve forces to help boost domestic maritime defense, Paul McHale, assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense, mid a luncheon gathering of the Washington, D.C. Chapter of the National Defense Industrial...
Navy Upgrading Sea-Mine Sweeper Helicopters
Budget cuts could slow development of airborne mine countermeasuresThe U.S. Navy intends to deploy the first MH-60S Knighthawk helicopters equipped with organic airborne mine countermeasures with carrier battle groups in 2005.Although the service has...
Navy Upgrading Sea-Mine Sweeper Helicopters: Budget Cuts Could Slow Development of Airborne Mine Countermeasures
The U.S. Navy intends to deploy the first MH-60S Knighthawk helicopters equipped with organic airborne mine countermeasures with carrier battle groups in 2005. Although the service has not yet designated which carriers will receive the countermine...
New Study Sheds Light on WID Membership
The membership of Women In Defense represents both government and industry. A recent study provides some details about that membership. A total of 92 percent is concentrated in the following nine states and jurisdictions: Virginia, 28%; Maryland, 18%;...
NorthCom Faces Growing Need for Information
Sharing information across government agencies and obtaining a "common operational picture" are key goals for the U.S. Northern Command, said Air Force Mat. Gen. Dale W. Meyerrose. As director of architecture and integration at U.S. Northern Command,...
State Volunteers
I recently read the December 2003 feature, "State Volunteers Eyed for Greater Security Role." I would like to make a comment or two. The Civil Air Patrol and the Coast Guard Auxiliary should not be compared to a state military defense force.CAP and the...
Terrorists Strive on 'Perverse Hopes,' Says Official
Contrary to popular belief, many suicide bombers come from middle-class, well-off families rather than from destitute ones, according to a Pentagon official. Therefore, the solution to stopping this kind of terrorism is not economic in nature, but...
TSA to Step Up Training of Armed Pilots
The Transportation Security Administration, starting this month, plans to double the number of pilots that it trains each week to provide armed security on airline flights, TSA Administrator James M. Loy told a recent congressional hearing. TSA's...
Uncertainty Remains about U.S. Landmine Policy
Alternative technologies not yet ready to replace landmines, U.S. claimsThe Bush administration is expected not to meet a 2006 deadline to commit the United States to the terms of the 1997 Ottawa landmine ban treaty. Meanwhile, there is mounting criticism...
Uncertainty Remains about U.S. Landmine Policy: Alternative Technologies Not Yet Ready to Replace Landmines, U.S. Claims
The Bush administration is expected not to meet a 2006 deadline to commit the United States to the terms of the 1997 Ottawa landmine ban treaty. Meanwhile, there is mounting criticism from arms-control advocates about the U.S. failure to ratify the...
U.S.-Led Coalition Seeks to Block Weapon Shipments
The United States and 10 other nations have embarked upon a controversial plan to limit the spread of weapons of mass destruction by blocking suspect shipments by air, land or sea. Since May, when President Bush launched the effort--known as the...
Washington Pulse
Pentagon to Assess Defense Industry CapabilitiesThe Pentagon is undertaking an assessment of the defense industrial base's capabilities to respond to the military services' needs, according to Suzanne Patrick, deputy undersecretary of defense for industrial...