Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 8, April

Altering the Structure and Culture of American Public Schools
Companies that have grown beyond the failed mass-production model have developed continuously improving work systems. Mr. Wilms points out that the same principles are found in lesson study, an innovation that he believes holds great promise for improving...
April Foolishness: The 20th Anniversary of A Nation at Risk
A Nation at Risk famously declared a crisis in American education. Even today, 20 years after the report's release, we cling to its message, which Mr. Bracey shows to be as flawed as it was compelling. TWENTY YEARS ago this month, James Baker, Ronald...
A SPECIAL SECTION ON TECHNOLOGY: Ambassadors of the Computer Age
Citizens from two groups that are typically undervalued in our society -- students with disabilities and the elderly -- were able to enhance one another's lives and skills thanks to the innovative program Mr. Jennings describes. STUDENTS JUDGED...
A SPECIAL SECTION ON TECHNOLOGY: Computers and Kids: Pulling the Plug Can Protect the Planet
At the very least, young people's exposure to computers needs to be supervised, Ms. Moll argues. And in the case of younger children, it may be inappropriate altogether. THERE ARE clear indications that young people are spending more and more time...
A SPECIAL SECTION ON TECHNOLOGY: One Order of Ed Tech Coming Up . . . You Want Fries with That?
Technology courses are standard requirements in today's schools of education. Why, then, Ms. Firek wonders, do new teachers enter the classroom without knowing how to use technology to help create meaningful learning? YET ANOTHER study has concluded...
A SPECIAL SECTION ON THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP: Education Reform as If Student Agency Mattered: Academic Microcultures and Student Identity
Placing the self and student agency at the center of the educational process might make educators steeped in subject-matter standards uncomfortable, Mr. Jackson avers, but at some level most laypersons understand the importance of a school culture...
A SPECIAL SECTION ON THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP: The Achievement Gap: Myths and Reality
The repeated attempts to explain and solve the vexing problem of the achievement gap have clearly been inadequate, Mr. Singham points out. Perhaps we have been focusing on the wrong factors entirely, he suggests. THE GAP BETWEEN the achievement...
Breaking out of Our Boxes
For too long we have been boxed in by an approach to education that does not meet students' needs. Mr. Patterson urges us to think differently about the most basic ways that schooling is organized and conducted in order to bring about truly substantive...
Classroom Crisis
The new testing requirements are the latest addition to an ever-growing list of demands on teachers that steal time from academic instruction. Ms. Meek gives a play-by-play account of a day in a third-grade classroom. How many minutes can actually...
COURTSIDE: The Case of the Purloined Letter
DURING THE 1999-2000 school year, seventh-graders John and Jane1 began going together at Northwood Junior High School in a small town near Little Rock, Arkansas. They primarily saw each other at school and at church, and their relationship was marked...
'I Need Time to Grow': The Transitional Year
Not every student is developmentally ready to move on to first grade after a year of kindergarten. The best gift we can give to those who aren't, Ms. Harris has found, is an extra year to mature -- mentally, socially, and emotionally -- in a nurturing...
POINT OF VIEW: Let Them Eat More Than Phonics
The "science" behind the food pyramid may have had the unintended consequence of a drastic rise in obesity. Mr. Zimmermann and Ms. Brown wonder if the federal "research-based" guidelines for reading programs will have similarly worrisome results. ...
Preventing School Violence
One of the most isolating experiences that students can have is to be rejected by their peers. In reviewing the research on this problem, Ms. Osterman made the surprising discovery that educators -- through action or inaction -- influence the quality...
PULSE OF THE PUBLIC: Age and Attitudes
THIS EDITION of Pulse of the Public probes the relationship between age and attitudes by comparing the responses of 18- to 29-year-olds with those of people 50 and older. Of course, we cannot establish causation beyond doubt, but one would suspect...
RESEARCH: Inequality from the Get Go
IN THE MAY 2000 column, I reported on the U.S. Department of Education's study of the characteristics of students entering kindergarten. Not surprisingly, the data showed large differences across ethnic groups (favoring whites and Asians) and socioeconomic...
Revisiting Summerhill
Remember Summerhill? After decades of interest in the school, Ms. Cassebaum finally realized her wish to see it firsthand. She was not disappointed. IMAGINE a school that has no grades or required classes, a school that posts or boasts no scores,...
STATELINE: States Ain't Misbehavin' but the Work Is Hard!
LAST NOVEMBER, members of the staff at the Education Commission of the States began to survey the states to determine how they were progressing toward meeting 40 of the requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. For those states that didn't...
TECHNOLOGY: Computer Adaptive Tests and Computer-Based Tests
SINCE I TEACH assessment classes at the university and write this Technology column, it makes sense that I should write a column on the intersection of these two topics. I wonder why I didn't think about doing such a column before? Before I get...
THE EDITOR'S PAGE: Ever 'At Risk'
IT IS HARD to believe that it has been 20 years. But this month marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of A Nation at Risk, and this month's Kappan carries an article by Gerald Bracey that looks at the life story of that document, at how it...
THOUGHTS ON TEACHING: Saffy's Big Idea
SAFFY stood on her tiptoes, her eyes open wide and her hands waving with excitement. Saffy's Big Idea exploded from her mouth in one breath. "Why don't we put on a play where reporters interview Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr., and the people...
WASHINGTON COMMENTARY: Students as Commodities
A STORY I find useful for all sorts of situations has to do with placing a frog in cold water and gradually warming the water. The frog is lulled into permanent -- and fatal -- complacency before it winds up on the dinner table. The chance to jump...