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Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 10, June

Backtalk
Stunned in Seattle As members of the board of directors of the Seattle Education Association, we were stunned to read in the January 2000 issue that our union has "presented a radical proposal that would transform the roles and responsibilities...
Beyond the Schoolhouse Door - How Charter Schools Are Transforming U.S. Public Education
Both charter enthusiasts and opponents tend to depict these schools as a revolutionary change, a policy earthquake, an unprecedented and heretofore unimaginable innovation. Both groups are probably standing too close to the objects they are describing,...
Charter Schools - Another Reform Failure or a Worthwhile Investment?
The fate of charter schools ultimately depends on the resolve of legislators to develop laws that allow for constructive innovation while balancing the needs of all students for access to safe and educative environments, the authors aver. AMERICAN...
Courtside - Tests on Trial
EFFECTIVE ON 1 February 1983, the California legislature amended the education code to require a basic skills test for teacher certification. Using the English language, candidates must demonstrate basic reading, writing, and mathematical skills....
Creating New Inequalities: Contradictions of Reform
High-stakes state-mandated standardization is rapidly spreading throughout the U.S. Ms. McNeil examines the widely emulated accountability system in Texas and concludes that it has adverse effects on teaching and learning, stifles democratic discourse,...
Desert Bloom - Arizona's Free Market in Education
With 351 charter school campuses, Arizona has developed the first statewide free market in education. The authors report on Arizona's five-year experiment, noting both promising findings and causes for concern. WHILE MANY public educators are more...
First Do No Harm
A DOZEN YEARS ago, Linda McNeil, then an associate professor and head of the Department of Education at Rice University in Houston, wrote a three-article series for the Kappan pointing out the dangers of centralized school reforms and their power to...
Following the Yellow Brick Road
The debate about technology in education is a red herring, Ms. Newman argues. The way in which we choose to use various technological tools is based on what we believe about learning in the first place - all the important questions are really about...
Index
Volume 81 September 1999 - June 2000 Anderson, Robert H., Rediscovering Lost Chords, Jan. 2000, p. 402. Becker, Jerry P. (with Bill Jacob), The Politics of California School Mathematics: The Anti-Reform of 1997-99, Mar. 2000, p. 529. Billig,...
Inquiry-Minded Schools - Opening Doors for Accountability
The authors have studied schools that are successfully using an ongoing inquiry cycle to improve student learning. They describe that process here - a process that builds the capacity to improve as the school's knowledge base increases. DEMANDS...
Looking at U.S. Education through the Eyes of Japanese Teachers
'the teachers are strict, but the principals are involved with the students.' Does this statement more accurately describe Japanese or U.S. education? Japanese teachers visiting Ohio on a three-month cultural exchange think it describes the U.S. Mr....
Performance Assessment and the New Standards Project - A Story of Serendipitous Success
In trying to invent a system of 'tests worth teaching to,' the New Standards Project achieved serendipitous success by developing and propagating a model for helping teachers form communities of learners and inquirers, Ms. Spalding points out. HISTORY...
Research - 'Diverging' American and Japanese Science Scores
THE LEAD article in the April 2000 issue of Educational Researcher asks a question in its title: "Beyond Fourth-Grade Science: Why Do U.S. and Japanese Students Diverge?" The answer, in part, is that they don't. And even if they did, the article doesn't...
Special Report - Middle-Grades Reform
Important Developments in Middle-Grades Reform By John Norton THANKS in part to a decade of determined advocacy, fueled by funders such as the Carnegie Corporation, the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, middle-grades...
Stateline - Politics, Elections, and Education
CAMPAIGN promises, political rhetoric, and staged photos of politicians and schoolchildren are going to put education in an unenviable position in the coming months. Improving, helping, and reforming education will be the stated goals, but in reality...
Technology - What's Next?
ABOUT A month ago, I was invited to speak to the Jacksonville Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa - nice group, by the way. The one glitch was that my topic was identified simply as 'technology.' I phoned the program director in a futile attempt to get a better...
TIMSS and High-Ability Students - Message of Doom or Opportunity for Reflection?
To propose that schools pay the same attention to the needs of high-end learners as they do to the needs of other students is to argue for nothing more than that schools value the potential of each individual and have as an immutable goal maximizing...
Washington Commentary - Rites of Spring
AS HIGH SCHOOL seniors carry out the rituals of their graduation ceremonies and experience the mixture of joy and anxiety that attends separating from an institution that has nurtured them for years, they probably see no signs of a revolution under...