Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 10, June

Accountability for Gifted Students
The call for a differentiated curriculum or program for gifted students raises the issues of how such changes should be made and how they should be assessed. Mr. Gallagher proffers some suggestions. One of the key elements of the new education reform...
A Distorted Perspective
We write in response to Maisie McAdoo's account of the New York Annenberg Challenge ("Buying School Reform: The Annenberg Grant," January), lest its distorted perspective and erroneous data mislead Kappan readers. We write because we are researchers...
A Lesson in Throwing Money
We close the 1997-98 school year with a report being taken by the Right - and by some moderates, too - as the latest and most powerful proof that throwing money at the schools doesn't work. This apparent downer, dated 16 March 1998, is a report from...
Boring or Bunkum?
Margaret Boring was a high school English teacher in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Employed there since 1979, she had built a national reputation for excellence in teaching drama and directing theater productions. Plays that she produced won numerous...
Canada's Participation in TIMSS
Canada is one of 45 countries that participated in the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, and New Brunswick took part both as "countries" and as part of the Canadian sample. However, only Ontario...
From Gifted Education to Programming for Talent Development
We need programming for talent development that will necessarily take forms that are different from those of the "gifted education" tradition out of which it is emerging, Mr. Treffinger maintains. The challenges facing public education today are at...
Living with Zero Tolerance
Student discipline and control entered a new era in 1994 when the federal government passed P.L. 103382, tagged the Gun-Free Schools Act. Prior to this time state legislation was not nearly so specific with regard to student discipline and control and...
Nurturing the Arts in Programs for Gifted and Talented Students
The authors make a case for including the development of talent in the arts as part of all programs for students identified as gifted and talented. It was a warm day in June on a university campus, and teenage students were pouring out of cars to attend...
Personal and Social Talents
Emotional and social intelligence will ultimately be proven to be important for two reasons, the authors predict. First, they are likely to be core requirements for success in certain occupations. And second, they may be a link between innate ability...
Politicians, Research Findings, and School Choice
Granted, it's asking a lot to expect politicians to make rational decisions that are based on facts. Most good research in education, for example, is apolitical, which in an election year is about as useful as a buggy whip at an auto trade show. The...
Programs for the Gifted Few or Talent Development for the Many?
Students at all ages and grade levels are entitled to challenging and appropriate instruction if they are to develop their talents fully, Mr. Feldhusen points out. The gifted education movement grew out of the pioneering research of Lewis Terman and...
Responses to Frequently Asked Questions about 12th-Grade TIMSS
The commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics responds to the most common questions and criticisms regarding the validity and relevance of the assessment of students at the end of secondary school, conducted as part of the Third International...
Talent Development: Two Perspectives
Educators must design educational programs that recognize, develop, and nurture talents in all our youths at all educational levels, the authors point out. They give readers a brief look at how two different school districts are going about that task....
Teaching and the Balancing of Round Stones
Like balancers of round stones, outstanding teachers "march to a different drummer" and do things their colleagues cannot do. Mr. Duffy looks at what those responsible for preservice and inservice teacher development can do to foster this trait. A friend...
Texas Scholars: Investing in the Future
The Texas Scholars Program, a joint business/education venture, has succeeded in making a more rigorous high school curriculum attractive to students who would not ordinarily choose such a path. The Texas Scholars program has demonstrated its value...
The Changing User
From time to time, I write a column on a topic that I've only recently begun to think much about. This is one of those columns. It might turn out to be full of half-baked ideas, but maybe sharing my thinking will get you thinking too. Lately, I've noticed...
The Development of Academic Talent: A Mandate for Educational Best Practice
The case could be made that all of education should be about talent development, a view of schooling that focuses on the optimal, not the minimal, development of each student, Ms. Van Tassel-Baska suggests. The earliest Western concepts of talent focused...
The NCAA: Major Barrier to High School Reform
Mr. Nathan blows the whistle on the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Liberals such as Jonathan Kozol, Deborah Meier, Asa Hilliard, and Theodore Sizer rarely agree with conservatives such as Jeanne Allen. So it is especially noteworthy that...
The Newspaper's Responsibility
In the end, Ms. Watson asserts, journalists cannot allow themselves to be swayed by consideration of whether a story will be good for the image of public schools. The job of journalists is to tell the truth and help readers understand the challenges...
The Problem of Out-of-Field Teaching
The real cause of the problem of out-of-field teaching, in Mr. Ingersoll's view, is U.S. society's lack of respect for the complexity and importance of the job. Few issues in our elementary and secondary schools are subject to more debate and discussion...
Who Cares? and So What?
I have just finished trying to help Phi Delta Kappa prepare a "reasoned and rational" response to the TIMSS (Third International Mathematics and Science Study) report purporting to show that American 12th-graders, when compared to students from other...