Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 74, No. 9, May

A Europe without Frontiers: The Prospects for Teachers
READERS may recall that 1993 is to be a key year in the history of European education. The advent of the single market and the directive issued by the European Commission in December 1988 (setting up a general system to recognize diplomas awarded on...
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A View from the Outside
FOR THE past couple of decades, we educators have been blamed for everything from the flagging economy to the less than perfect performance of American automobiles. By the late 1980s, the drumbeat of criticism had become relentless and inescapable,...
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Does Anybody Care?
As a professor in a college of education, Ms. Amspaugh was accustomed to hearing complaints about the indignities that teachers suffer. But only after she spent a year teaching in a first-grade classroom did she truly understand the desperation that...
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Environmental Education: Bringing Children and Nature Together
THREE YEARS ago I wrote for the Kappan about an innovative science education project that culminated in a summer session for at for at-risk elementary students. We held our summer session in a junior high school building, and on the last day the children...
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Experiential Environmental Education in Russia: A Study in Community Service Learning
Mr. Silcox describes a people-to-people student exchange that had as its focus the environmental monitoring of Novgorod, a city in Russia -- and the issues for further research that this exchange raised. ON 20 JUNE 1992 a group of 26 American students,...
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From Normal to Nerd - and Back Again
LISTENING TO people talk about the middle school years, I often think that phase should be renamed the "muddle school years," with many children mired in a state of "mental pause." More formally stated by Susan Harter, Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell, and...
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Improving High Schools: The Case for New Goals and Strategies
To improve schools, what we need are not new policy gimmicks, a national curriculum, or more multiple-choice tests, Mr. Wagner avers, but rather some old-fashioned democratic virtues. WHILE NEARLY everyone agrees that we need to improve our nation's...
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Mail Bias?
THE PRIVATE Express Statutes grant the federal government a monopoly on postal service by prohibiting, with certain limited exceptions, the private carriage of letters over postal routes without the payment of postage. The "letters of carrier" exception...
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Misrepresentations and Idiosyncratic Methodology
IN HIS article, "World Class Standards, Choice, and Privatization: Weak Measurement Serving Presumptive Policy," which appeared in the October 1992 Kappan, Richard Jaeger violates his own methodology, a particularly egregious fault since he is a professor...
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No Principal Is an Island
BRINGING teachers out of their professional isolation has become a popular topic of research and discussion. It has become apparent that when teachers work cooperatively -- sharing ideas and observing one another's strengths -- the effects are positive...
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Off Track in Alexandria
THE PRECEDING report demonstrates that traditional quantitative approaches to research may miss essential elements of what is being studied, while less traditional, qualitative methods may have limited degrees of generalizability. This distinction...
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On the Treatment of Authors, Outliers, and Purchasing Power Parity Exchange Rates
IN HER RESPONSE to my October article, Ruth Stotts indulges in and ad hominem attack that lacks cohesive logic. Within her 2 1/2 pages of typescript, Stotts accuses me of "violating [my] own methodology," of submitting an article that is "replete with...
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Perspectives on Education in America
WHEN THE governors and President George Bush set forth national education goals in the wake of the September 1989 education summit in Charlottes-ville, Virginia, we at Sandia National Laboratories took note. We also listened to a challenge from the...
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Removing Barriers to Professional Growth
School systems need to identify factors that might be hindering teachers' professional growth. Mr. Duke suggests that these systems start by looking at their policies on teacher evaluation. A PROFESSION is never mastered. Professionals grow older...
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Science Shy, Science Savvy, Science Smart
If the large majority of tomorrow's citizens don;t achieve scientific literacy, society may be in peril, Ms. Fort warns, for ignorance in the postindustrial era can devastate the planet. AMERICANS OF all ages and in all walks of life tend be scientifically...
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The Sagging Infrastructure of State Policy Making
WATCHING STILL another legislative season unfold always causes me to wonder whether the process of making state policy is as efficient and effective as it could be. Ideas old and new seem to float from state to state in unpredictable ways. Last year's...
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Thinking Backwards to Move Forward
THERE SHOULD be only one reason to restructure our school system: the students. We will take that premise as the starting point of our description of a process that should precede and inform any restructuring efforts. Before "unstructuring" (dismantling...
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Using Research to Improve Clinton's Education Bill
THE CLINTON Administrations education bill that is working its way through Congress looks a lot like last year's version, which died in the final days of the session. The new bill is a warm-up for bigger things to come (especially the reauthorization...
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