Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 1, September

Black, White, and Brown
FORTY YEARS ago the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in Brown v. Board of Education, that "in the field of public education the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place." In this month's Kappan, Forrest White describes the well-planned campaign to establish...
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Brown Revisited
The school desegregation battle passed relatively quickly, Mr. white points out--but the scars of the efforts to forestall desegregation are far more lasting and can still be seen today. ALTHOUGH THE conventional view of Oliver Brown, et al. v. Board...
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Building High-Tech Schools
Hello. I have been asked by the editors to write a monthly column on computers and technology. The instructions were clear: give concrete advice that is useful. I think I can handle that. I was also instructed to introduce myself to Kappan readers...
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College and Me
If GARRETT Community College (GCC) in McHenry, Maryland, sent out a press release with the headline "Nontraditional Student Population Rising at GCC," no one would bat an eye. But if the heading went on to say, "That's Because Every Fifth-Grader in...
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Gangs and America's Schools
ONCE THE exclusive concern of poor neighborhoods in our large cities, youth street gangs have lately inspired an almost paralyzing fear in both suburban and rural middle-class communities across the nation. Somehow the perception has been created that...
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Mainstreaming: One School's Reality: For More Than Seven Months the Authors Observed Carol Masterson's Classroom at Coats Middle School, a Public School in a Southeastern Suburb of a Large City in Texas
For more than seven months the authors observed Carol Masterson's classroom at Coat's Middle School, a public school in a southeastern suburb of a large city in Texas. Like many schools across the country, Coats is mainstreaming almost all special...
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NAEP and the Quality of Education
ALTHOUGH the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) was never intended to measure the quality of education and was never linked to any curriculum, there has been increased interest of late in the state-by-state comparisons emerging from...
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Satanic Tourism: Adolescent Dabblers and Identity Work
No concern so fuels the fears of our uncertain age as does the worry that we may be overtaken by a horde of Satanists, rejecting all the moral verities that supposedly undergird our society. Schools, families, and churches have all become subject to...
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Taking Parents' Liberties
A FEW WEEKS after the beginning of his freshman year in high school in Fulton County, Illinois, Luke P. and his eighth-grade girlfriend broke up. Luke was upset by the breakup. During the following week, which was early October, he met with school...
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Teachers Can Take Control of Reform
THE RHETORIC about change in education sometimes gets so deep that it threatens to overwhelm us. Nevertheless, this school year may become a watershed year for public education. And that's because teachers, students, and learning are replacing policies,...
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The Illusion of Technique and the Intellectual Life of Schools
The title of a book by William Barrett sums up what ails American education. Barrett's book (which is about 20th-century philosophy) is called The Illusion of Technique. The education establishment in the U.S. has, to a large extent, bought into a...
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The Scent of the Future
EVENTS on the state education scene have produced a blizzard of news activity over the summer. Yet coverage in the general press has not been extensive. Education stories that in other years would have received national attention were relegated to...
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The State of Chicago School Reform
To dwell on the fact that the ultimate aim of reform has not yet been accomplished can be very debilitating, the authors point out. A more prudent and productive approach would focus on evidence that these initiatives are evolving in ways that are likely...
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Thinking of Inclusion for All Special Needs Students: Better Think Again
Full inclusion, in which the regular education teacher must learn a monumental number of additional skills in order to deal with both special and regular education students, may be state-of-the art education for the Nineties -- the 1890s, that is --...
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Who Will Speak for the Children; How 'Teach for America' Hurts Urban Schools and Students
With its inadequate training of recruits -- many of whom will teach in urban schools -- and its disregard for the knowledge base on teaching and learning, `Teach for America' continues a long tradition of devaluing urban students and deprofessionalizing...
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