Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 78, No. 4, December

A Battle Is Raging over Ontario Education
Battle lines over who should have control of education have been drawn in Ontario. From the very first days after the Progressive Conservatives won the provincial election in June 1995 on a platform of what they called a "common-sense revolution," skirmishes...
A Rare Religious Reversal
Congress enacted Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 "to provide full educational opportunity to every child regardless of economic background." Under Title I school districts receive and spend federal funds for remedial education,...
A Turn Down the Harbor with At-Risk Children
Mr. Meyer describes a cooperative project between California State University in Fresno and local school districts that enables 200 or more Liberal Studies students each semester to "give back to America" by providing one-on-one mentoring of at-risk...
Flavor Crystals as Brain Food: Unplug TV Commercials in Schools
Private, vulnerable, and sacred, a human's psyche is not a commodity to be sold. Yet such commerce will continue until we ban TV commercials from our schools, Mr. Fox warns. "What's advertised on Channel One?" "Cinnaburst," replied Eric, a ninth-grader....
Gift-Giving Ideas
In past years I've titled this annual column "Seasonal Shoppers' Guide." I'd like to call it my Christmas Column, but that would be politically incorrect. I've given the matter some thought, and it seems to me that girl giving and shopping are not the...
Kentucky's Conflicting Reform Principles: High-Stakes School Accountability and Student Performance Assessment
High-stakes accountability in Kentucky has focused attention on important questions about teaching and learning, but it has not supplied the answers to those questions, the authors point out. Those answers must come from the responses of teaching professionals,...
KERA: A Tale of One School
Mr. Rothman describes one Kentucky school in which, thanks to the state's reform law, no child today is lost in the shuffle. From its inception, the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) has been hotly controversial. The most sweeping statewide education...
KERA: A Tale of One Teacher
How can you tell another teacher how to teach? That's a question that many people in Kentucky and around the nation are beginning to ask. Ms. Holland explains why. Kentucky was an unlikely place for the birth of a national model of school reform. For...
National Tests Ignite Scorching Debate
Most readers of this column were not close enough to the debate over national tests to know how intensely hot it got. Those who were witnessed an unbelievable scene. The debate was scorching, divisive, and deeply disturbing to many people in many fields...
No Strings
The policy makers are adept at getting good press for themselves by pulling educators,' strings. President Clinton's "America Reads Challenge" is a good case in point. Clinton's goal, which is laudable, is that every 8-year-old must be able to read....
On Creating a Climate of Classroom Civility
Mr. Kauffman and Mr. Burbach help teachers understand some of the most common trigger mechanisms in youth violence and present guidelines for inducing a higher level of civility in the classroom. The growing recognition of youth violence in schools...
Reading Matters: Supporting the Development of Young Adolescent Readers
Ten years ago, the Indiana Middle Grades Reading Network was only a gleam in a foundation program officer's eye. Today, as a comprehensive grant-making program, it has provided hundreds of thousands of books for young adolescents and provided training...
Sensationalism, Politics, and Literacy: What's Going On?
Ms. Flippo provides evidence that, despite extreme differences in philosophy, expert reading researchers do agree on a number of practices and contexts with regard to reading instruction and development. These must not be ignored, she warns, in favor...
Surviving TIMSS: Or, Everything You Blissfully Forgot about International Comparisons
Mr. Baker answers a number of frequently asked questions about U.S. performance on past international studies, about the strengths and weaknesses of these kinds of studies, and about what the Third International Mathematics and Science Study will ultimately...
The Holocaust and Education
Michael Berenbaum's understanding of and expertise on "the paradigmatic event of evil of our time" is beyond question, Mr. Goldberg points out. Berenbaum's mandate now is to determine with his staff the best ways of sharing with the education community...
The Japanese Education System Is a Failure, Say Some Japanese
Educational demographer Harold Hodgkinson returned from his first visit to Japan in the summer of 1997, bringing with him a number of observations and an editorial from the 9 June 1997 edition of The Daily Yomiuri, an English-language daily. The editorial...
The Possibilities and Problems of Collaboration
When groups of adults get together to fix education, the result is often one loud voice pitted against another loud voice. While student achievement gains, or the lack thereof, are always the primary focus of the would-be fixers, they are also used to...
The Promise and Limits of School-Based Reform: A National Snapshot
A National Snapshot The authors summarize what has been learned about school-based reform from a recent national study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. The focus on the individual school as the key to a successful reform strategy has...
Volunteer Tutoring Programs: Do We Know What Works?
Ms. Wasik reviews the current state of knowledge about the effects on achievement of various tutoring programs that use adult volunteers. If the America Reads Challenge is to attain its ambitious goals, it is essential that its tutoring programs be founded...