Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 93, No. 8, May

A View from the Classroom
Christine Love Thompson supports greater accountability for teachers and several other broad scale initiatives on the education reform agenda, including school choice. But the 5th-grade teacher who also is a 2011-12 PDK Emerging Leader said the largely...
Beginning Teacher Induction What the Data Tell Us: Induction Is an Education Reform Whose Time Has Come
Since the advent of public schools, education commentators and reformers have perennially called attention to the challenges encountered by newcomers to school teaching. Although elementary and secondary teaching involves intensive interaction with...
Curiosity Is Not Good-But It's Not Bad, Either: Why Does Education Try to Tamp out Curiosity the Way a Parent Would a Cigarette from the Mouth of an Adolescent? Is Curiosity among Students and in the Classroom a Bad Thing?
In a Sunday New York Times piece, Virginia Heffernan--observer of technology and culture--described her experience of seeing dermoid cysts for the first time. Dermoids are hideous, and more: they're spiritually troubling. As malformed embryonic...
Forever a Unique Approach to Philanthropy: When American Honda Motor Co. Invested in Education, It Helped Create a School as Unique as Its Philanthropic Philosophy
"So, just how long do you intend to support this school and professional development center in our county?" a Grand County, Colo., commissioner asked in 1992. "Forever," replied Mak Itabashi and Tom Dean. They were speaking for American Honda Motor...
From Charity to Solidarity
Imagine starting elementary school as a 5-year-old in a classroom where there are no picture books or chapter books. The only reading materials are government-issued textbooks and workbooks. There are no posters or sight words on the wall, just a drab...
Grassroots Philanthropy on the Prairie: A Group of Teachers Leads a Community to Band Together to Provide for the Urgent Needs of Its Least Fortunate Students
Twenty-one students were homeless. One student had asked a cafeteria worker on a Friday afternoon for leftover food to take home for the weekend. Those were among the facts that high school English teacher Ann Haugland heard at a professional development...
If I Were a Rich Man
Everybody, it seems, wants to get into bed with Bill Gates these days. Not him exactly, but his checkbook. They're all talking about the grant they're seeking or the presentation they're making to a foundation panel or just musing about how much...
Investing in High School: Strapped for Cash, a Massachusetts High School Starts Its Own Venture Fund to Grow Teacher Leaders and Encourage Innovation. Test Score Gains and Higher Teacher Satisfaction Result
In June 1998, two veteran teachers at Brookline High School stood before Headmaster Robert Weintraub's desk asking for money. Gayle Davis and Margaret Metzger requested funding for an innovative teacher mentoring program, which promised to provide...
Lesson of the Heart an Extra-Credit Assignment: The Most Important Qualities for Teachers Are Empathy, a Work Ethic, and a Genuine Fondness for Students
In today's world of proficiency tests and state report cards, teachers feel increasing pressure to become more and more involved in the paperwork of teaching--test scores, benchmarks, grade-level indicators, record keeping. Important? Yes, very important....
New Talk about ELL Students
Students from immigrant families, including foreignborn children and those born in the United States to immigrant parents, are a large and growing segment of the student population. In 2005, the U.S. had about 11 million school-aged children of immigrants,...
Philanthropy Gets in the Ring: Eu - Funders Get Serious about Education Policy: If Education Philanthropists Want to Influence Policy, Then They Must Open Themselves to More Public Debate about Their Plans and Goals
The year 2005 seems like a long time ago. That year, I published a hard look at education philanthropy titled With the Best of Intentions: How Philanthropy is Reshaping K-12 Education, using the dismal experience of the then recently concluded $1.1...
Running the Race When Race Is a Factor: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Prepare a Disproportionately Large Percentage of Black Students for the World of Work and Graduate School. They Also Prepare Them to Respond Productively When They Encounter Race-Related Problems
Joseph, a black male high school student who grew up in a suburban, predominantly white Southern city, is a first-generation college goer. His parents, extended family members, and community leaders emphasized the value of obtaining a postsecondary...
The Art of Celebrating School
Few activities bring students, parents, school staff, businesses, and community partners together with as much joy as creating a work of art. As a collaborative artist, I have had the opportunity to work with schools and communities across several...
The Diversity Challenge
Humanity seems to face two great challenges in the 21st century. First, can we avoid polluting our planet until it becomes unlivable, and, second, can we find a way to live with others who are different from us without war, violence, and prejudice....
The How of Hope
Many young people dream the American dream, believe it can be achieved, and haven't a clue how to make it a reality. Their will often exceeds their ways, and this hamstrings hope. Students generally are confident. They think "I can do anything!"...
The Madness of Teacher Evaluation Frameworks
The clouded language of educational theorists hinders thought and under-standing. --Richard Mitchell Once again, we're rushing headlong to embrace yet another unproven, hastily conceived innovation in the hope that it will improve school quality....
The Science of Professional Development: If You Offer Professional Development in Science, Will Teachers Come? More Importantly, Will It Matter If They Do?
For any professional development program to be successful, teachers must first participate in the learning. But what attracts teachers to certain professional development opportunities while they ignore others? How do we know that teachers will take...
Venture Philanthropy's Market Strategies Fail Urban Kids: Endorsing Schools That Address the Poverty That Confronts Low-Income Students Would Be a More Effective Way to Spend Foundation Dollars
Take charter schools, for instance. Despite enthusiasm for them from venture philanthropists, research on the results is mixed. No conclusive study says charter schools as a whole outperform traditional public schools. There are good charters and bad...
What's New Is Old? Industrial Philanthropic Focused on Institution Building; Today's Philanthropists Are Backing Bold, Entrepreneurial Initiatives and Advocating for Broad-Based Reforms
Philanthropy as we know it in the United States is an omnipresent entity. It has greatly shaped American society, including arts and culture, health care, colleges and universities, and schools. Major philanthropy has played a crucial role in K-12...
What's the Value of VAM (Value-Added Modeling)? Value-Added Modeling Is Likely Here to Stay. Although VAM Has Some Advantages over Traditional Teacher Assessment Methods, There Also Are Shortcomings That Should Be Noted
The use of value-added modeling (VAM) in school accountability is expanding. But deciding how to embrace VAM is difficult. Various experts say it's too unreliable, causes more harm than good, and has a big margin for error. Others say VAM is imperfect...
Where Is Leadership Heading? Research Shows That the School Improvement Remedies Promoted by Policy Makers and Reformers Often Are in Stark Contrast to What Actually Has Been Proven to Work in Schools
A consensus is emerging about how school leaders affect school performance and the importance of strong principals to improved student learning. In spite of the strength and consistency of research in this area, however, policy makers and reformers...