Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 87, No. 3, November

A New World View: Education in a Global Era
Guest editors Stewart and Kagan reflect on what the articles in this special section have taught us about the impact of globalization on education systems around the world. They conclude with recommendations for steps the U.S. can take to advance its...
A New World View: Education in a Global Era: The Phenomenon of Globalization Presents Education Systems around the World with Both Challenges and Opportunities. Ms. Kagan and Ms. Stewart, Guest Editors of This Special Section, Point out That the U.S. Has Much to Learn from Other Countries-And Much to Teach, as Well
GLOBALIZATION is an increasingly prominent feature of contemporary societies. From one continent to another, information, lifestyles, and commodities traverse the planet. What happens in one nation affects life in others. International exchange is...
A World Transformed: How Other Countries Are Preparing Students for the Interconnected-World of the 21st Century
Whether by incorporating the study of other nations and cultures into the school curriculum or requiring students to learn foreign languages or encouraging cross-cultural exchanges, countries around the world are preparing their students for life in...
Disaster Technology and Scholarly Tools Revisited
LIVING in a coastal city and being an offshore mariner makes me give more thought to disaster preparedness than some. For example, my boat has two of almost everything, including two VHF radios, one a handheld submersible; two bilge pumps; two manual...
Does Size Matter?
CANADIANS have reached consensus on two issues. Our weather should be better, and class sizes should be smaller. Everyone takes comfort in restating the obvious, it seems, and neither topic goes away for long. Class size isn't exactly a new-millennium...
Early Childhood Education and Care in Advanced Industrialized Countries: Current Policy and Program Trends: By Examining the Advanced Industrialized Countries' Growing Commitment to Expanding Early Learning Opportunities, Ms. Kamerman Explores Several Policy Trends and Identifies Issues Looming on the Horizon
WHETHER in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries, the countries of the EU (European Union), the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) and Central and Eastern European countries, the ASEAN (Association of Southeast...
Early Learning Standards: What Can America Learn? What Can America Teach? the Authors Share Their Experiences in Working with Representatives of Six Developing Nations in a Project to Draft Early Learning Standards
PERHAPS nowhere is the international transmission of ideas and knowledge better understood or more widely practiced than in the field of early childhood education. For decades, transcontinental exchanges have made early childhood education an international...
Fostering Foreign Language Proficiency: What the U.S. Can Learn from Other Countries
The U.S. has long been indifferent to the study of foreign languages. But other countries have made language instruction a central part of education. The authors point to successful features of programs in other parts of the world that the U.S. can...
Global Early Care and Education: Challenges, Responses, and Lessons: Countries throughout the World Are Committed to Improving Their Systems of Early Care and Education. Ms. Neuman Identifies the Three Challenges That Most Countries Face, Describes the Strategies That Various Countries Have Adopted, and Suggests Which Approaches Might Prove Helpful in the U.S
HERE IS a global movement under way to foster the development and learning of young children. Supported by international conventions and policy statements over the past 15 years, this movement has manifested itself in concrete efforts and investments...
Increasing Math and Science Achievement: The Best and Worst of the East and West: The East Asian Countries Are Known for Their High Scores on International Comparisons of Math and Science Achievement. This Does Not Necessarily Mean, Mr. Zhao Cautions, That the U.S. Should Rush to Adopt Their Practices and Abandon Its Own Strengths
IN MARCH 2005, during the annual session of the Chinese National People's Congress, a group of members of the Chinese legislative body introduced a proposal calling for an immediate overhaul of the New Mathematics Curriculum Standards for elementary...
Legal Sanctions
FROM 1994 to 1998 Robert M. was a student at Bret Harte Union High School, which is in a district of the same name located in central California near Yosemite. He received some Section 504 accommodations during his first three years, and in October...
More Than Just Cute Kids
THERE is a well-known adage in print journalism that a picture is worth a thousand words. If a cuddly baby or shyly smiling youngster is part of the picture, the value goes up immensely. It is this automatic appeal that helps explain to me why it has...
Paraprofessionals on the Front Line
YOUR school might call them paraprofessionals, teacher aides, teacher assistants, para-pros, instructional aides, or noncertified staff. Sometimes they help students one on one. They read with the Bluebirds and the Robins in the little chairs at the...
Questions and More Questions
FOR AS LONG as I can remember, coal mining has been among the world's most dangerous occupations. But data mining can be hazardous, too--if not to life and limb, then certainly to sanity. The deeper you go, the more you wallow in the numbers, the harder...
Reshaping the University in an Era of Globalization: Globalization Has Exerted a Significant Impact on Many Aspects of Universities. but, Mr. Ruby Points out, Because Universities Deal with the Creation and Dissemination of Knowledge, They Are in a Position to Influence Globalization as Much as It Has Influenced Them
GLOBALIZATION clearly affects every aspect of our lives. What does it have to do with universities? Quite a bit. It affects curriculum, faculty recruitment, student recruitment, sources of food for the dining halls and of funds for the endowment, and...
Rethinking Education in the Global Era: As the World Becomes Increasingly Interconnected through New Technologies, the Education Systems of Many Nations Will Necessarily Begin to Converge in Their Approaches and Objectives. Mr. Suarez-Orozco Shares His Ideas of What Schools Will Need to Focus on If They Are to Produce Global Citizens
HUMAN SOCIETIES, in all their breathtaking differences, face a common task: transferring a range of skills, competencies, values, and sensibilities from one generation to the next. The socialization of the young is culturally defined, highly varied,...
Take a Giant Step: Investing in Preschool Education in Emerging Nations: As the Global Economy Expands, Emerging Nations Are Finding That Focusing on Universal Primary Education Is Not Sufficient, Mr. Levine Argues. They Are Increasingly Coming to See the Value of Investing in Early Care and Education as Well
HE SPEED at which globalization and technological innovation have transformed and "flattened" economic, political, and social relationships in the past decade requires a new approach to investments related to early childhood. While most of the international...
Teaching as a Profession: Lessons in Teacher Preparation and Professional Development
In the global era, teachers must have the preparation and skills to teach students to the highest standards. U.S. efforts to improve teacher education have resulted in some excellent opportunities for educators to learn and refine their craft, but,...
The Bachelor's Degree: A Hereditary Privilege?
RIGHTLY or wrongly, more and more people are coming to believe that a college degree is necessary for achieving the good life in America, exceptions like Bill Gates notwithstanding. It is dismaying, then, to find that the acquisition of this degree...
The Case for Universal Basic Education for the World's Poorest Boys and Girls: Giving All Children, Including the Most Vulnerable, Access to a Good Education Will Require Serious Commitments from Both Developing and Wealthy Nations. Mr. Sperling Details the Numerous Benefits That Will Accrue from a Global Compact to Achieve This Goal
ONE OF THE silent killers attacking the developing world is the lack of quality basic education for large numbers of the poorest children in the world's poorest countries--particularly girls. Yet unlike many of the world's most grievous ailments, this...
The Importance of International Benchmarking for U.S. Educational Leaders: One of the Best Ways for Educational Leaders in the U.S. to Improve Their Systems, Mr. Houlihan Suggests, Is to Be Open to Learning from the Approaches of Their Peers in Other Countries
INTERNATIONAL comparisons of education policy and practice were, until recently, the domain of just a small group of researchers. But with the rapid changes being brought about by globalization, they are fast becoming a significant new tool in the...
The New Enterprise Logic of Schools: More Than Incremental Changes Are under Way in Schools around the World, Mr. Caldwell Informs Us. and the Individual Is Becoming the Most Important Unit of Organization
MOST initiatives to enhance the quality of education in public schools in the U.S. have counterparts in many Western nations and in several nations in the Asia Pacific region. I am concerned with four such initiatives: the decentralization of authority...
The Universal Pre-K Bandwagon: Is Universal Prekindergarten an Idea Whose Time Has Come? If the Experience of Half a Dozen States Is Any Guide, the Answer Just Might Be Yes
A QUIET revolution in our thinking about 4-year-olds has occurred. Two generations ago, we thought that they should stay at home with their mothers. Then, as women joined the work force in record numbers, we decided that 4-year-olds could spend substantial...