Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 89, No. 2, October

Are International Tests Worth Anything?
Do the U.S. rankings on international achievement tests signal doom for the country's future standing in the world? Mr. Baker sets out to answer that question by looking beyond the test scores to other dimensions on which nations can be compared. ...
Bong Hits?
ON 24 January 2002, the Olympic Torch Relay passed directly in front of the high school in Juneau on its way to the Winter Games in Salt Lake City. The school's principal, Deborah Morse, had decided to allow the students to witness the relay as an...
Bridges, Tunnels, and School Reform: It's the System, Stupid: What Could the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Teach School Leaders about Reform? Exactly What They Need to Know to Succeed, Mr. Kelly Suggests
AFTER ALMOST three decades of school reform, student achievement nationally is about where it was when we started, and student behavior has declined dramatically. Numbers of dropouts, especially in our cities and among the poor and minorities, have...
Confessions of a Wonk
I'M REMINDED this week of a time long ago when my son Huck and I would curl up on the couch to watch his favorite TV show. No, it wasn't some kiddie show with a strange dancing dinosaur or a Cookie Monster. Even at 3, his tastes turned more to stories...
Do States Have the Capacity to Meet the NCLB Mandates? Ms. Sunderman and Mr. Orfield Explore the States' Responses to NCLB and Assess the Likelihood That State Education Agencies Will Be Able to Meet the Law's Demands with Their Current Knowledge and Resources
THE STATES have always been central to the American public school systems, and they have been sharply expanding their authority over local school districts since the 1980s. The states adopted education reforms that increased course requirements (especially...
Dynamic Inequality and Intervention: Lessons from a Small Country
Students enter school with different levels of academic readiness, and these differences increase through the grades. Mr. Grubb uses lessons gleaned from Finland's schools to suggest ways in which the U.S. could decrease this inequality. EVERY LEVEL...
Educational Trends in China and the United States: Proverbial Pendulum or Potential for Balance?
To meet the demands of globalization, Chinese education is becoming increasingly decentralized and learner-centered. Ms. Preus points out that this is precisely opposite to the direction of recent U.S. reforms. CHINA'S emergence in the global economy...
Formative Assessment: What Do Teachers Need to Know and Do? to Many of todayAEs Teachers, Assessment Is Synonymous with High-Stakes Standardized Tests. but There Is an Entirely Different Kind of Assessment That Can Actually Transform Both Teaching and Learning. Ms. Heritage Describes What the Skillful Use of Formative Assessment Would Look Like
FORMATIVE assessment, if used effectively, can provide teachers and their students with the information they need to move learning forward. But after more than a hundred years of exhortations and a significant body of research on the topic, the idea...
Instructional Insensitivity of Tests: Accountability's Dire Drawback: If We Plan to Use Tests for Purposes of Accountability, We Need to Know That They Measure Traits That Can Be Influenced by Instruction. Mr. Popham Offers a Model Procedure for Judging Our Tests
LARGE-SCALE accountability tests have become increasingly important. They influence the deliberations of policy makers and affect the day-by-day behaviors of teachers in their classrooms. The premise underlying the use of these accountability tests...
Language Learning and National Security
THE FRONT page of a newspaper or the TV news must seem like a foreign language to a huge percentage of K-12 students. Recent surveys of high school youths by National Geographic-Roper found in 2002 that only 17% could locate Afghanistan on a map; less...
Learning from the World: Achieving More by Doing Less
Countries that score higher in international comparisons than does the U.S. also require less time in school, assign less homework, and use less high-tech gadgetry. Mr. Baines argues that maybe it is time we learned from them. AT THIS moment, in...
Minding Our Measures
IT WAS only recently that I painted over the marks on the doorway where a couple times a year my two boys would press their behinds firmly against the jamb and stand as tall as they could. I'd lay a pencil across each one's head and make a horizontal...
Online Books and Audiobooks
RECENTLY, my relatively negative perception of the availability of online books and audiobooks changed radically. It all started when I read a short blurb on the website http://manybooks.net. Manybooks was created by Matthew McClintock, who graciously...
The Beep Heard Round the World
IN MANY ways 1958 was a watershed year for U.S. education--and for me. Readers of a certain age will surely find the brief history lesson with which Gerald Bracey opens this year's Bracey Report more reminder than news release. For me, it's a bit of...
The First Time 'Everything Changed': The 17th Bracey Report on the Condition of Public Education
Mr. Bracey looks back at an event in the Fifties that seemed to change everything for the U.S. as a whole and for U.S. education in particular. Working his way forward to the present day, he makes it clear that the time when everything changed also...