Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 3, November

A "Communally Bonded" School for African American Students, Families, and a Community
Not all urban schools that serve African American communities are the disasters portrayed in the media. Mr. Morris shares insights he has gleaned from a seven-year study of Farragut Elementary School in St. Louis, a school that has "bonded successfully"...
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A KAPPAN SPECIAL SECTION ON TESTING AND ACCOUNTABILITY: A Different Look at Accountability: The EdVisions Approach
EdVisions Cooperative, a venture started by eight charter schools in Minnesota, redefines accountability for schools, teachers, and students. According to Mr. Newell, EdVisions' system of project-based learning for students and peer evaluation for...
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A KAPPAN SPECIAL SECTION ON TESTING AND ACCOUNTABILITY: Consumer- Referenced Testing
Many Americans have less accurate information about the tests used to measure their children's academic achievement than they do about a can of beans, Mr. Behuniak argues. If we wish to remedy this situation, we need to focus on the needs of those...
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A SPECIAL SECTION ON GENDER EQUITY: Something Is Missing from Teacher Education: Attention to Two Genders
Assumptions about gender roles continue to limit children's aspirations and achievements. If we are to overcome those limitations, Ms. Sanders argues, gender equity must become a standard part of the curriculum of preservice teacher education. ...
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AT ODDS: PROJECT STAR: A Superficial Take on Project STAR
Jeremy Finn's labeling of the Project STAR research as "scientific" and his failure to acknowledge the project's design flaws are a disservice to the educators who look to the Kappan for trustworthy interpretations of research, Mr. Shaver points...
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AT ODDS: PROJECT STAR: Missing the Mark
Mr. Shaver has implied that, because of some apparent flaw in the research, the finding of small-class benefits is wrong. That conclusion, Mr. Finn retorts, would indeed be wrong. UNFORTUNATELY, James Shaver's bilious commentary about my article...
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COURTSIDE: Horace . . . Mammon, Not Mann?
##Perry A. Zirkel IN SEPTEMBER 1995, Robert Hennessy, who was majoring in elementary education, entered his senior year at Salem State College in Massachusetts.1 He enrolled in a course on multiculturalism taught by Mary-Lou Breitborde, the chair...
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HIGH-STAKES TESTING: Division in the Ranks: Standardized Testing Draws Lines between New and Veteran Teachers
In the end, Ms. Winkler found that variation in teachers' attitudes toward the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) test depended primarily on their own accrued time in the profession. Experienced teachers saw the test in terms of losses, while...
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HIGH-STAKES TESTING: National Board Certified Teachers in Ohio Give State Education Policy, Classroom Climate, and High-Stakes Testing a Grade of F
Mr. Rapp shudders to consider who will be running our schools and what values will be emphasized a decade from now if the perspectives of teachers and parents continue to be excluded from the debate. IN AN ARTICLE that appeared in the June 1997...
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IN CANADA: Tales from the Jungle
THE RESULTS of a new Health Canada study on "Work-Life Conflict" confirm what a lot of weary Canadians have suspected for a long time. Those who are juggling paid work and family responsibilities are at serious risk of dropping all the balls.1 After...
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PULSE OF THE PUBLIC: A Follow-Up on the Voucher Issue
FOR SOME time, we have felt that we should make more use of the results of the annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools. We also believe that reporting relevant data from other polls will enrich the...
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RESEARCH: Another Nation at Risk
ON 4 December 2001 Germany took a massive blow to its national ego. PISA, the Program of International Student Assessment that was cobbled together by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, delivered the haymaker....
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STATELINE: States Take on the Training of Paraprofessionals
AMONG its requirements concerning assessment and accountability, the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act attempts to improve the quality of educators, including paraprofessionals. All paraprofessionals hired after 8 January 2002 must meet one of the...
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TECHNOLOGY: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act and Other Egregious Laws
OVER THE last four years, we Americans have lost a considerable number of our constitutionally guaranteed rights. And the sad part is, most people didn't even notice. Even sadder, perhaps, is the fact that these rights were given away by the very...
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The Career Switcher Program
The authors describe a program, begun at Old Dominion University, that brings into the teaching profession highly qualified people -- many of them able to teach in hard-to-staff disciplines. AN ARMY captain, an Air Force lieutenant colonel, and...
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THE EDITOR'S PAGE: A Moving Target
MORE THAN half a century ago, George Gallup, Sr., pioneered what came to be known as "scientific polling," an effort to capture public opinion in a way that was both accurate and reliable. We all know the size and influence of the industry that...
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WASHINGTON COMMENTARY: A Horse Called NCLB
WHEN the horse dies, many school reformers advise riders to dismount. Don't buy a new whip, don't form a committee to study the horse, and don't blame horses. In other words, when things are not working, change them. The same advice should be...
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Why Teach Certain Material at Specific Grade Levels?
What criteria and guidelines are used to place content at specific grade levels or to align standards with the curriculum? The authors have searched for years for the answer but keep drawing a blank. NO SOLID basis exists in the research literature...
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