Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 1, September

Backtalk
As the Tree Grows The cartoon on page 697 of the May issue is cute, but I'm afraid it won't promote knowledge in botany. Perhaps few readers will see anything wrong with the "science" of the cartoon. But trees only grow from the top up. If one...
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Can We Practice What We Preach?
Her lesson plans were very good, and the eighth-graders did learn - but not as fast or as thoroughly as Ms. Marks wanted them to. Something very critical was missing. AS EDUCATORS of teachers, it is easy for us to instruct preservice teachers...
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Courtside - What Ever Happened in the Appeal of . . . ? Part I
IT IS NOT particularly uncommon for this column to end with a caveat that the case described is subject to further judicial proceedings, typically by way of an appeal filed by the losing party. In the 15 years that I've been writing this column,...
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Creating a System That Gets Results for Older, Reluctant Readers
Ms. Taylor explains why the Orange County Literacy Project, a program for middle school students struggling with literacy, was highly successful with both students and staff members. TEACHING STUDENTS who arrive at middle school and either can't...
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Differentiation
When Ms. Tukey decided to introduce differentiation into her classroom as a way to help students improve their writing skills, she discovered that it was more complicated than she had thought. But the reward was seeing her students' delight when...
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Do Charter Schools Do It Differently?
The authors discuss two studies that show that charter school leaders assemble and deploy their professional staffs in ways that aren't possible in traditional schools. And, since the heart and soul of any school is its teaching staff, few things...
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Grades for Schools Reach All-Time High
PUBLIC SCHOOLS enjoy great success in educating those children from backgrounds that prepare them to learn. They are far less successful with youngsters who come to school crippled by the impact of poverty. And, absent an approach to the problem...
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Hi, My Name Is Velma!
Pendulum swings in education can be opportunities to improve one's teaching. What Ms. Swartz objects to is being told that what she was doing was wrong and then, with the next swing, being told that she was right after all. IN THE FALL of 2000,...
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In Canada - the Decline of Small Pleasures
LATELY the Canadian media have been awash with articles and commentary on reading. We're rather smug about how much we read as a nation and how much international attention our authors command. And despite the competing priorities of busy lives,...
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Kudzu, Rabbits, and School Reform
We, the people, appear to understand that the linchpin of each American's necessary apprenticeship in democracy is a qualified, caring, competent classroom teacher, Mr. Goodlad points out. The role of Presidents and governors is to cheer us on,...
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Learning to Discipline
At the start of her teaching career, Ms. Metzger confesses, she ricocheted between being a drill sergeant and Mary Poppins. Here she shares with new teachers the many lessons she's learned along the way about classroom discipline and classroom management....
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'Mom, Will Kaelie Always Have Possibilities?' - the Realities of Early Childhood Inclusion
Ms. Hanline and Mr. Daley discuss and dismiss the myths surrounding the inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood education programs. LEIGHA, THE 5-year-old daughter of one of the authors, recently asked, "Mom, will Kaelie always...
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Research - Summer Loss: The Phenomenon No One Wants to Deal With
AS I REPORTED in the March Research column, poor students lose academic ground over the summer, while their middle-class and affluent peers gain in reading and hold their own in math. This strikes me as an important finding, but it seems to have...
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School Change and Inclusive Schools: Lessons Learned from Practice
The authors discuss 10 lessons that they hope will help professionals create inclusive schools in which more children fit naturally into classrooms and differences are viewed as an ordinary part of the school day. THIRTEEN years ago, a local...
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Stateline - Getting Policy Makers Literate on Literacy
SOMETIMES grandmas do know best. Especially if they have a grandchild who is struggling to learn to read. Especially if grandma is a reading expert in her own right. And especially because grandmas care enough to badger, cajole, and relay what it...
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Technology - Sex, Potato Chips, and Media Literacy
NOW THAT I have your attention, what on earth does sex have to do with potato chips? Simple answer: sex is often used to sell things. Imagine a television commercial with Britney Spears nibbling a handful of Lay's(r) potato chips. You and I might...
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Washington Commentary - Where Is the NCLBA Taking Us?
THIS OUGHT to be an exciting, positive time for American education. This new school year marks the beginning of a new era of activism in education policy when some stubborn shortcomings of education finally are being addressed - from federal offices...
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Why Are Experienced Teachers Leaving the Profession?
Conditions that undermine the power and effectiveness of our public school system need to be identified and promptly rectified, the authors warn. This includes, above all, creating a work environment that will continue to draw the bright, committed...
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