Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 87, No. 10, June

Accountability Comes to Preschool: Can We Make It Work for Young Children?
Early childhood educators are justifiably concerned that demands for academic standards in preschool will result in developmentally inappropriate instruction that focuses on a narrow set of isolated skills. But Ms. Stipek believes that teaching...
ADD = Compute?
FROM 1986-87 to 2000-01, Gerald Hess worked for the school system in Rochester, New Hampshire, as a middle school computer education teacher. In 1995, his physician diagnosed him with ADHD. In September 2000, having been given an additional diagnosis...
April Showers Bring May Flowers
WHILE STATE legislatures have been very busy during the first four months of the year, the rate of passage for bills does tend to crescendo as the sessions progress. By April, the volume is usually at its peak, as many legislatures speed toward...
Books for Summer Reading
Maybe the song says there "ain't no cure for the summertime blues," but many educators have discovered that they can use the summer months to self-medicate with any number of good books. And this year Roger Soder and the crew of voracious readers...
Contamination of Current Accountability Systems: It Is Assumed That Accountability Systems Will Provide Reliable Data on Which to Base Education Policy. but Ms. McGill-Franzen and Mr. Allington Maintain That Four Overlooked Factors Are Consistently Producing Skewed Pictures of Student Achievement
WE SEE nothing wrong with the essential notion of accountability in education. As public employees, educators should expect to be held accountable for their use of public funds. Nonetheless, the various state governments and now the U.S. Department...
Disrespecting Childhood: Although Americans See Ours as a Child-Loving Nation, the Authors Present Evidence of Policies and Practices That Are Not Respectful of Children or Childhood. They Call on Us to Question the Assumptions about Our Young People That Form the Basis for Our Teaching, Research, and Policies
What I discovered in Spain was a culture that held children to be its meringues and eclairs. My own culture ... tended to regard children as a sort of toxic waste. (1) IN THE POPULAR imagination, Americans are a child-loving people. Across the...
Dropping in on Dropouts
AS WE come to the end of another school year, it seems appropriate to take another look at students who have brought their school careers to a premature end--dropouts. Dropouts have become big news lately. The National Governors Association made...
Generation 'M' and 3G
GENERATION M stands for either "Generation Media" or the "Millennials." See Neil Howe and Bill Straus' book Millennials Rising. Both terms refer to the group of young people who are growing up in the early part of this century. The Millennials are...
Getting Past Futile Pedagogical Wars
Ever since America got into the business of public schooling, there have been debates over what is the best way for teachers to teach. After researching 100 years of classroom instruction, Mr. Cuban calls for a truce in the "pedagogical wars," arguing...
Handcuff Me, Too! Ms. Chenfeld Puts Herself in the Shoes of an Eager, Curious, Hopeful Kindergartner and Finds That It's a Sadly Scary Place to Be
IN OUR STEADY diet of shocking daily news stories, one item I saw recently was particularly shocking. A 5-year-old kindergarten child just "lost it" in her classroom, went a little berserk, threw violent fits, and had to be restrained with handcuffs....
It's the Curriculum, Stupid: There's Something Wrong with It: Educators, Parents, and Employers All Seem to Agree on the Types of Skills They Believe Students Should Be Developing. but Mr. Brown Finds That the Traditional Curriculum, Divided Up into Separate Subjects, Neither Engages Students nor Prepares Them for Productive Lives. He Believes That the Answer to Both Problems Is to Have Students Design Their Own Curricula
WHILE waiting in Chicago for my connecting flight, I wandered over and picked up a USA Today to browse through the day's national events. I seldom get past the first section before I drop the paper and return to reading something more substantial....
Keeping Adolescents 'Alive and Kickin' It': Addressing Suicide in Schools: A Teacher May Be the Only Adult a Student Trusts Enough to Confide in. Thus Mr. Fisher Wants Teachers to Encourage Free Discussion in the Classroom and to Be Prepared to Help If a Student Shows Signs of or Admits to Being Suicidal
WHAT COMES to mind when you think of the word adolescence? First dates? A driver's license? Hormones? If you are the teacher of one of the more than 500,000 young people who attempt suicide or the 5,000 who succeed in committing suicide each year,...
Looking through Different Lenses: Teachers' and Administrators' Views of Accountability: Teachers and Principals Don't Always Agree about the Effects on Education of Accountability Systems Based on High-Stakes Testing. Mr. Jones and Mr. Egley Look at the Implications of These Differing Perceptions and Suggest Some Strategies for Creating a Climate in Which Teachers and Administrators Can Move Forward on Improving Student Learning
SEVERAL Kappan articles have appeared over the past few years about how teachers perceive the effects of test-based accountability programs on public education. (1) These studies have shown that teachers have many concerns about high-stakes testing,...
My Mother's Teaching Career-What It Can Tell Us about Teachers Who Are Not Fully Certified: While Ms. Clement Favors More Traditional Paths to Teaching, Culminating in Full Certification, She Admits That There Are Other Viable Options. after All, Her Mother Was a Fine Teacher, and Her Only Credential Was a High School Diploma
AS A PROFESSOR of teacher education, I occasionally get on my soapbox about teachers who aren't fully certified. Even though I know that full certification doesn't necessarily mean fully qualified or master teacher or even fully committed teacher,...
No Enfant Left Behind
THERE WAS a solar eclipse the other day, and it made me think of NCLB. (Perhaps it's time for a vacation.) Actually, this isn't as far-fetched as it sounds. Because over the past four years, I've watched the shadow of NCLB incrementally extinguishing...
Puzzling about Virtue
THIS MONTH I'm traveling to eastern Kentucky to attend a conference on community sustainability, an important challenge for the small communities snuggled into the state's narrow valleys and along its rugged mountainsides. In these places, like...
Rationing Education in an Era of Accountability: The Push for Accountability Was Originally Cast as a Way to Ensure That Schools Would Leave No Child Behind. Ironically, as Ms. Booher-Jennings Points out, the NCLB System of Requiring Schools to Demonstrate Adequate Yearly Progress through Test Scores Has Created Incentives to Neglect the Very Students Who Need the Most Help
MEET Mrs. Dewey, 46 years old and a veteran fourth-grade teacher at Marshall Elementary School. Mrs. Dewey entered the teaching profession in the wake of A Nation at Risk and has weathered the storm ever since. For the last 20 years, she has survived...
Something Old, Something New
MY LIST of recommended readings for this summer consists of only two items. One is rather dated, and if you haven't read it yet, don't bother. Its theme is echoed in just about every resource you might have come across in the last two decades. The...
What We Know and Don't Know about Improving Low-Performing Schools: Recent Studies of Turnarounds of Low-Performing Schools Have Focused on the Factors That Made Their Successes Possible. Mr. Duke Has Realized That It Would Also Be Valuable to Look at What Made the Schools Decline in the First Place and the Factors That Might Hinder Their Transformation
EDUCATORS have long sought to understand the dynamics of turning around low-performing schools, but interest in the subject has clearly intensified in the past decade, largely because of state and federal accountability initiatives and the prospect...