Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 94, No. 6, March

A Crooked Path to Success: Becoming a Successful Student, Particularly for Those Who Have Fallen Behind, Requires Motivation, Engagement with School, and Authentic Ownership of One's Own Education
Who would not want their children to be straight-A students? For parents and teachers, the implications of having youngsters earn near-perfect grades are quite clear. Straight-A elementary and middle school students commonly have more access to learning...
Another Revolution Starts in Boston: High School Students in Boston Transform Conversations on Teacher Evaluation and Succeed in Having Their Voices Heard
Seven years. A lot can happen in seven years: The first African-American president was elected in the wake of the worst recession since the Great Depression, "Avatar" shattered box office records, ousting "Titanic," the Arab spring brought down decades-long...
Being Here, but Not Here: The Story of How Immigration Policy Affected One Girl's Potential and Decisions Calls for More Action
It would be difficult for a person not to like Jacqueline. Her lively personality, openness, and intelligence contrast with a simple yet thoughtful demeanor. Her modest background growing up in the U.S. as an illegal immigrant from Mexico does not...
Call for Manuscripts, 2013-14
Kappan editors are inviting submissions of manuscripts to be considered for publication in the 2013-14 volume of the magazine. Writing for Kappan gives educators an opportunity to give back to the field by sharing what you've learned with colleagues...
Cross the Street to a New World: Learning about and Respecting Each Student's Family, History, and Literacy Skills Will Improve Educators' Opportunity to Reach Those Students
I remember walking the last blocks to a teaching assignment in a public elementary school in the Bronx. I was eager to get into the classroom to get to work, despite vague warnings about how exhausting--even dangerous--teaching in the inner city can...
Emerging Leader: Turning around Schools and Futures
Sherrod Willaford is principal of C.J. Hicks Elementary School in Conyers, Ga., which is part of the Rockdale County Public Schools. He has led a turnaround at the school during his six years there. Recently, Willaford answered some questions from...
Going Where Every Man Has Gone Before: The Easy Availability of Razzle-Dazzle Technology Isn't Enough to Transform Classrooms. without Rethinking Schools and Instruction, Technology Is Just a Gimmick
I started seeing television advertisements for Verizon's VGo robot in January. The twowheeled VGo is a sleek device about the height of a 3rd grader with a tablet computer instead of a face. In the ad, the VGo rolls down a school hallway and into class,...
Hispanics and Education: By the Numbers
Hispanic population growth accounted for 51.4% of the total U.S. population growth between 2000 and 2009; whites accounted for 18.8%; blacks, 13.6%; Asians, 13.8%; others, 2.6%. U.S. population breakdown Population Percent of Population...
How Much Private Schooling Is Bad for the Public? in Apportioning Public versus Private Schooling, Governments Must Consider the Evidence of Equity in Educational Outcomes That Such Systems Produce
One of the most contentious issues in education policy is the role of the private sector. Defenders of public education--and I count myself as one--often see private schools as inimical to a strong public education. The worry is that a large private...
If It's Good Enough for Joe ... Video Offers Teachers and Leaders the Opportunity to Find and Cure the Small Mistakes That Have a Big Effect on Learning
"Let's go to the tape" is one of the most commonly used phrases in sports when trying to dissect what happened on a given play. Rather than working from memory, a coach, spectator, or athlete replays the videotape to get a better sense of what occurred....
Linguistic Capital Pays Dividends: Millions of U.S. Residents Speak Spanish at Home, a Skill That Should Be Treated as a Valuable Asset, Not a Problem to Be Remediated
Some 37 million U.S. residents speak Spanish at home, and more than 55% of them say they also speak English (American FactFinder, 2010). That creates what Bordieu called linguistic capital (1993). Although linguistic capital is difficult to quantify,...
Novice Career Changers Weather the Classroom Weather: A Close Look at One Professional's Career Change into Teaching Illustrates Unique Challenges and Qualities, Showing in Stark Relief What Makes the Induction Smoother and the Experience More Successful
When adults who have been successful in career and life decide to enter teaching, they embark on a unique professional experience. At first, they expect to tread a familiar path since they all spent many years as students. But moving from being in...
Schooling the Mayors: Big-City Mayors Are Missing Opportunities to Improve Relationships and Services between Schools and the Social, Health, and Other Related Agencies That They Also Control
The volatile clash between the Chicago Teachers Union and Mayor Rahm Emanuel last fall has once again illustrated the complex issue of mayoral involvement in educational governance in the nation's urban school districts. The movement toward mayoral...
Seeing an Invisible World: Let's Make Sure That Cultural and Interpersonal Awareness Are on the Menu in Our Schools and throughout Our Nation
One young waitress came in to listen to the newscast on Univision. Then, another. Finally, all six of the waitresses at El Zocalo, a restaurant in Detroit's Mexicantown neighborhood, stood stunned before the set. My husband and I were having dinner...
Seven Ways to Kill RTI: Even Good Interventions Can Go Bad If They're Not Planned and Supported Well. Heed Some Warning Signs about Response to Intervention
Who knows if there will be newspapers five years from now. But, if some of them are still around, will we see such an entry? As much as I hope that this obituary doesn't come true, I fear it will, especially if schools across the nation continue...
South African Education Has Promises to Keep and Miles to Go: The Fall of Apartheid Brought Promises for Education Progress in South Africa, but Much of It Remains Unrealized, Especially in Small and Rural Towns
The South African constitution enshrines the right to education for everyone, but the reality is that, almost 20 years after the transition from apartheid to democracy, the country's education system remains highly differentiated. Schools that serve...
Support Parents to Improve Student Learning: Efforts Are Building to Translate Traditionally Strong Family Relationships among Latinos into Stronger Performance at School
It is 6 p.m. on a crisp winter night, and 30 parents are seated at long folding tables covered in bright blocks of blue and yellow construction paper inside the cafeteria at Lorenzo De Zavala Elementary School in West Dallas, Texas. Soft Christmas...
Talking Back to International Test Scores
Equip yourself with talking points about how the U.S. fares against other nations on international assessments. This report is challenging to read but can help you understand some of the pitfalls of international comparisons. Among the points in...
Teaching a New Chapter of History: Educators Must Find Ways to Incorporate the Uniquely American Culture and History of Latinos into School Curricula
When you hear "civil rights movement" you think about the African-American civil rights movement. ... I don't think that [Mexican-American history] is seen as part of the main historical narrative. ... I wanted students to connect to the material and...
The New Latino Diaspora: The Surging Hispanic and Latino Population across the Country Has Brought New Education Challenges and Opportunities to Rural and Small Town America
It's the first day of school, and Christine eagerly awaits her students. Although she is a veteran kindergarten teacher in the Marshall School District, she has only recently begun to teach students of Mexican heritage. This year, the number of Spanish...
Todo Tiene Que Ver Con Lo Que Se Habla It's All about the Talk: A District Focuses on the How of Teaching to Propel Student Achievement against the Odds
The numbers are grim. Nearly 18% of Hispanic 18- to 24-year-olds in the United States were high school dropouts, far more than the percentage of black and white students (Aud & Haines, 2012). Hispanic students made achievement gains in mathematics...
Warning: The Common Core Standards May Be Harmful to Children: The Language Arts Standards of the Common Core in Too Many Places Are Simply Too Difficult And/or Irrelevant for Elementary Grade Students
When I first read the Common Core English/language arts standards for grades K-5, my visceral reaction was that they represented an unrealistic view of what young children should know and be able to do. As an elementary teacher and principal for most...
What's So Special about an IEP? School Districts Must Ensure That Transition Services for Older Special Education Students Are Designed to Help Students Be Successful in the Work World
Robert, a high school student receiving special education, was approaching the end of his formal public school education. Yet he still had not acquired the skills needed to live an independent life. The Dracut (Massachusetts) School District maintained...