Wordsworth Circle

International quarterly journal focusing on contemporary studies of literature, culture, and society primarily in England during Romantic period.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 2, Spring

Abrams among the Nightingales: Revisiting the Greater Romantic Lyric
Forty years after publication, M.H. Abrams's "Structure and Style in the Greater Romantic Lyric" (1965) remains a touchstone of literary criticism. (1) Abrams's account of the introspective and meditative aspects of Romantic lyric remains a model of...
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Earl Wasserman: A Critical (Re-) Reading
To illuminate Earl Wasserman's critical moment, I begin with a meditation on Post-Kantian aporia. When the history of the New Criticism is written, its line of descent will begin with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and indirectly from Immanuel Kant. Mobilizing...
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E. P. Thompson and Radical Romanticism
As I have reread The Making of the English Working Class and numerous other texts by Thompson, I find myself thinking in terms of blindness and insight, not in the absolute deconstructive binaries employed by Paul de Man, but rather to signify the...
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From the Editor: Landmark Works and Commemorations
Landmark Works and Commemorations: For the 2005 meeting of the Wordsworth-Coleridge Association in Washington D.C., we invited contributions on "Landmark Works," books and articles published during the 20th century that characterized and shaped the...
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Letitia Landon and Romantic Hellenism
"Wordsworth is a poet that even Plato might have admitted into his republic. He is the most passionless of writers. Like the noblest creations of Grecian sculpture, the divinity is shown by divine repose" (Landon, Letters, 145). In this excerpt...
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"Married at Last": A New Source for Clare's "Don Juan"
The references to Queen Victoria and to Prince Albert in Clare's "Don Juan" (Early Poems I 92-94), while echoing Byron's poem in several particulars, are usually interpreted as expressions of Clare's mental illness, as they mostly are: --Prince...
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Massaging Erotic Coleridge
One gets so used to thinking of Coleridge as depressed--even hilariously, overdramatically depressed--that one can't imagine another way of looking at him. Gloom envelops him as well as the study of him. A glimpse of joy or wit rouses a chuckle, but...
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Revisiting 1970: Carl Woodring and Politics in English Romantic Poetry
"If only our Counter-culture were a bit more articulate and sensitive to literature, it could work together with literary scholarship and learn from Romantic insights into the political function of the imagination.... Mr Woodring's book opens up these...
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The "Character" of James the First and Antiquarian Secret History
Isaac D'Israeli's An Inquiry into the Literary and Political Character of James I (1816) was less concerned with recreating James as an historical personality than with challenging his representation in national histories as a degraded stylized "character."...
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The Long Revolution of Raymond Williams: Culture and Society Fifty Years On
The scene was an Oxford lecture hall in the off-term, a gathering in the early 1970s of international summer school students. Among the many things I was clueless about that undergraduate summer is that I was catching my only glimpse of Raymond Williams...
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Wordsworth and the Ordnance Survey in Ireland: "Dreaming O'er the Map of Things"
Wordsworth had been planning a visit to Ireland ever since his first meeting with the Irish Astronomer Royal, William Rowan Hamilton, in September, 1827. Introduced by Caesar Otway, author of Sketches in Ireland, whose book Wordsworth received that...
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