Black Issues in Higher Education

Black Issues in Higher Education is a magazine specializing in African American Focused topics.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 17, October 7

A Higher Education Wake-Up Call
Whoever wins the November election has a rough row to hoe where higher education is concerned. A recent report, "Measuring Up 2004: The National Report Card on Higher Education," produced by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education,...
Black Greek-Lettered Organizations and Civic Responsibility
On the eve of the first centennial celebrations for Black Greek-lettered organizations (BGLOs), and at this crucial time in American electoral politics, it is important to discuss the potential impact of BGLOs in advancing African American civil and...
Brown Receives $100 Million-Largest Gift for University
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Brown University has received a $100 million gift from a liquor importer for its financial aid program, allowing the Ivy League school to offer its neediest students outright grants instead of loans. The gift is the largest single...
Congress Returns to a Full Plate with Little Time: Perkins Act, HEA Renewal to Dominate Sessions
Despite the few days left on the legislative calendar, Congress came back in September for a fall session that has education experts cautiously optimistic about the prospect of action on subjects ranging from technical education to the 2005 budget....
Coppin State Researchers Investigate Weather Patterns' Influence on the Middle Passage
BALTIMORE A team from Coppin State University is using images from space satellites to investigate how the patterns of winds and ocean currents may have influenced the forced migration of Africans to the Americas. The project began on June 1 and...
Getting in on the Act
On the second night of the Democratic National Convention in Boston in July, most of the country, and the world for that matter, was introduced to U.S. Senate candidate Barack Obama of Illinois. Following his speech, political pundits, journalists,...
NJIT Professor Honored for Breakthrough Stem Cell Research
NEWARK, N.J. Dr. Treena Livingston Arinzeh was recognized recently by President Bush for research showing that adult stem cells could help patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, bone and cartilage damage and related diseases. Arinzeh,...
Obama Rising: All but Assured to Become the Fifth Black American to Hold a Seat in the U.S. Senate, Obama Represents to Many the Emergence of a New Generation of National Political Leadership
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. Less than two months after a stellar keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention in Boston, Barack Obama took his U.S. Senate campaign to the community colleges of Illinois. Over two days in September, reporters traveling...
Presidential Proposals: Candidates Envision Ways to Promote Postsecondary Education
Questions of military service and non-service, missing weapons of mass destruction, Iraq, Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden, 9/11, the threat of further terrorist attacks and the unprecedented suggestion that U.S. elections may be postponed are topics...
Report: U.S. Falling Behind in Percentage of Young Adults with High School Diploma
WASHINGTON A growing number of nations are doing a better job than the United States in getting young people through high school and college, a study found. Among adults ages 25 to 34, for example, the United States is 10th among other industrialized...
Riley House Receives Collection of Abolitionist Papers
TALLAHASSEE, FLA. The John G. Riley Center/ Museum of African American History and Culture formally received a nationally significant collection of Black abolitionist papers last month at Tallahassee Community College Library. The collection,...
Sallie Mae Appoints Director of HBCU Initiatives
RESTON, VA. Sallie Mae, the nation's leading provider of education funding, announced recently that Denise Chaisson has been appointed director for the company's historically Black college and university (HBCU) initiatives. In this role, Chaisson...
Saving for College May Result in Future Losses, Report Says
Pinching pennies early for college and investing in state-sponsored savings plans actually result in a net loss for students, considering the financial aid reductions that may result, particularly for low-income students who plan to attend community...
Study: Women Faculty at Pharmacy Schools Face Barriers to Advancement
ALEXANDRIA, VA. A recent study published in the online edition of the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education reveals that women faculty at pharmacy schools continue to face disparities in administrative positions, salary and advancement opportunities...
The Power of the Youth Bloc: Civic Advocates and Campaign Strategists Say This Population Could Swing the Presidential Election
While youth voting has declined precipitously since 1972, the year 18-year-olds first won the right to vote, there's a bright spot in the statistical picture, according to a national expert on youth civic engagement: African American youth. "Since...
U.S. Health Care Professions Separate and Unequal: Sullivan Commission: Lack of Diversity May Be Greatest Cause of Health Disparities
WASHINGTON A lack of diversity among health care professionals is placing the health of at least one-third of the nation at risk. This fact was among findings announced recently by the Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce...
Wanted: A Solid, Reliable PC
Your computer is working now. Will it work tomorrow? What about the next you buy? Will it be a reliable work-horse, or a lemon? One of the most pressing issues regarding computers is reliability. Nearly a quarter century after the introduction of...
Winston-Salem State Students Question Blair's Appearance
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Some Winston-Salem State University students are questioning the school's decision to bring disgraced journalist Jayson Blair to campus to speak. Ebonee Russell, a senior and a reporter for The News Argus, the historically...