Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 10, September 3

Cutting-Edge Cats
Byline: Alexandra Peers Amateur kitten videos are pouncing on the art world. On Aug. 30, the well-respected Minneapolis institution the Walker Art Center will hold the first-ever film festival of Internet cat videos. The screenings, to be held...
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Fall's Big Reads
Byline: Jimmy So and Lucas Wittmann Eleven must-have books. Fall is here, and that means publishers are rolling out their heavy hitters. What a lineup it is: from Salman Rushdie's years in hiding to Tom Wolfe's first novel in eight years and...
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Home Stretch
Byline: Dan Gross The housing market is making a comeback. Until recently Douglas Yearley was among the many real-estate CEOs laid low by the housing crisis. Two years ago his company, Toll Brothers, produced a paltry 2,642 homes, far below the...
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How Much Would You Pay for Three More Months of Life?
Byline: Laura Beil 'Death panels' are a bad idea. But asking hard questions about health care is not. In his more than 35 years of practice, Dr. Lowell Schnipper has seen a lot of women die from breast cancer. A patient's options start to dwindle...
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How to Spot a Workplace Crazy
Byline: Lloyd Grove The warning signs of office mayhem. Most mornings, Jeffrey T. Johnson emerged from his one-bedroom sublet on Manhattan's East 82nd Street wearing a stylish suit--looking more like an executive than the laid-off women's handbag...
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Katie Goes on an Adventure
Byline: Howard Kurtz Can Couric crack daytime? Ever since Oprah Winfrey abandoned her glittering daytime talk show last year for the struggling cable network that bears her name, people have wondered who might fill the void she left behind. But...
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Lakhdar Brahimi
Byline: Christopher Dickey Taking on a tough assignment. The new United Nations envoy to Syria had the good sense to try to beg off. Former Algerian foreign minister and veteran U.N. troubleshooter Lakhdar Brahimi is 78 years old and has seen...
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Mom, When Can I Go to Mars?
Byline: Martin Rees NASA's Curiosity and the search for alien life. Charles Bolden, NASA's administrator, asserted that the robotic vehicle Curiosity will "blaze a trail for human footprints on Mars." He could be right. But there is a gulf between...
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My Bootlegging Grandpa
Byline: Matt Bondurant The real story behind the new movie 'Lawless.' I think my grandfather would be delighted at being portrayed by as talented a young actor as Shia LaBeouf. He stars in the new film Lawless, based on my novel The Wettest County...
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My Favorite Mistake: Ira Glass
Byline: Ira Glass On his dog with a ridiculous diet. I've definitely had a f--ked up life in a lot of ways, but not because of big turning points where I made the wrong choice. It's more like character flaws that played out slowly over time....
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Out of the Rough
Byline: Leslie Andrews Why Augusta matters. One small green jacket for woman; one giant step for womankind. In a move that prompted a collective yawn and the occasional "it's about time" grumble, Augusta National Golf Club last week announced...
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Shiny Objects
Byline: Chris Lee Pop stars in chrome cars. When Justin Bieber was cited for reckless driving last month, the teen heartthrob claimed he was simply trying to avoid aggressive paparazzi. His car, however, made flying under the radar impossible....
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The Mysterious Monsieur Hollande
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan American Roulette Nearly 20 years after it asked to join the World Trade Organization, Russia has finally been admitted to the global body, which counts on its roster every major economy and--come to think of it--virtually...
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This Is the Museum of the Future
Byline: Orhan Pamuk Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk explains why he built a museum dedicated to the glory and tragedy of one fictional couple's love. The museums I visited in my childhood--not just in Istanbul but even in Paris, where I first went...
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What Mitt Should Say
Byline: Peter Beinart The four things you won't hear in Tampa. Here's what Mitt Romney will almost certainly talk about in his acceptance speech this week in Tampa: his experience in business, his experience running the Olympics, the number of...
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'What the *#@% Is Wrong with Republicans?!'
Byline: Kathleen Parker How GOP men are ruining the party The "idea cloud"--that cumulus cartoon bubble that dumps the same idea on diverse populations at once. Alternatively, blame Todd Akin, the Missouri congressman and Senate candidate who...
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Who Needs College?
Byline: Niall Ferguson Higher education is becoming the new caste system. School is in the air. It is the time of year when millions of apprehensive young people are crammed into their parents' cars along with all their worldly gadgets and driven...
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Winning
Byline: Buzz Bissinger To hell with the doping charges. Lance Armstrong performed miracles. Stop tearing down our idols. Why I still believe. On the website where seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong explained why he would no longer...
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