Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 160, No. 09, August 27

Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi
Byline: Christopher Dickey In Egypt, a crucial changing of the guard. A remarkably quiet revolution recently took place with the naming of Gen. Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi, 57, as Egyptian defense minister and commander-in-chief of the armed forces....
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A Writer Unravels
Byline: D.T. Max David Foster Wallace was buoyed by Franzen, sunk by Karr. In 1990, David Foster Wallace, only 28, had already lived a chaotic life: he'd been a literary star, a teacher, and a depressive, had attempted to take his own life and...
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Bernard-Henri Levy Says: Stop the Slaughter in Syria Now!
Byline: Bernard-Henri Levy In a personal plea to the world, the French philosopher argues that as Bashar al-Assad murders his own people, it's time for the world to drop its alibis, follow the Libyan example, and act to end the killing. The Syrian...
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Can India Get to Mars without Electricity?
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Tainted Tycoon South Korea, normally a land where punishment for the law-breaking superrich amounts to little more than a slap on the wrist, has seen a spectacle that leaves the national jaw agape. A court sentenced...
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Educating Suri
Byline: Lizzie Crocker TOMKAT Looks to brand-new school. When Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes drop their daughter off for her first day of school next month, they won't be going to Dalton or Spence, nor even Scientology's own Sea Org, as Cruise might...
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How to Play a Tycoon
Byline: Jacob Bernstein Richard Gere taps the inner depths of a crooked financier. Guys who are a bit of a mess are just more fun. "Those roles are easier to play," says Richard Gere, sipping a glass of water at a restaurant in Sag Harbor,...
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Jumping the Gun
Byline: Rob Cox Should Benjamin Lawsky have waited? The usher shouting fire in a crowded movie theater should see flames before sending patrons stampeding for the exits. If the danger is real, he emerges a hero. A false alarm gets him fired....
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Mitt's Seedy Coming-Out Party
Byline: Lloyd Grove A mobbed-up past, a surplus of strippers: Tampa's got it all. "Do you have a house down here yet?" Florida Gov. Rick Scott asks. "You have to move, right? You don't have a choice. Better buy now. Housing prices are up 16 percent...
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My Favorite Mistake: Megyn Kelly
Byline: Megyn Kelly The Fox News anchor on her "aha moment." I was badly bullied when I was in the seventh grade--relentlessly, mercilessly--by a group of 12-year-old girls. And it left me with a determination that no matter what, I had to throw...
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Schadenfareed
Byline: Tunku Varadarajan Plagiarism and the lynch mob. Fareed Zakaria's prominence as an American journalist began in the days after Mohamed Atta and his murderous band laid waste to the World Trade Center. Then on Newsweek's payroll, Zakaria...
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Secrets of 'The Master'
Byline: David Ansen Inside director P.T. Anderson's 'Scientology movie.' Scene for scene, shot for shot, Paul Thomas Anderson may be the most exciting American writer-director of his generation. He's a kind of cinematic chemist who works with...
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The Big Picture
Byline: Blake Gopnik Art galleries are getting huge. This campaign season, the talk across America is about tightened belts and reduced expectations. The art world hasn't heard it. New York's biggest galleries are about to get bigger, and some...
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The Real Indiana Jones
Byline: Tony Dokoupil Forrest Fenn has hidden a million dollars of his treasure--and he wants you to find it. "I'm sure not going to die in a hospital bed," Forrest Fenn likes to say, and at 82 years old his is not an idle promise. He has spent...
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The Violence We Don't See
Byline: Peter Beinart Americans need to wake up to attacks on U.S. Muslims. When Muslim extremists attacked their third American church in three days, the cable networks cut away from regular programming to cover the news. When militants vandalized...
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Why Obama Must Go
Byline: Niall Ferguson The president has broken his promises, and Romney-Ryan's path to prosperity is our only hope. I was a good loser four years ago. "In the grand scheme of history," I wrote the day after Barack Obama's election as president,...
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Why We Love Being Conned
Byline: Megan McArdle Looking for a fail-safe plan to get rich without working? Sure you are--and that's the problem. Arbitrage, Nicholas Jarecki's ambitious new film about a financial tycoon juggling various forms of fraud, hits theaters in...
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