Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 11

A Deal for the History Books: The Auto Takeover May Be Remembered for All of the Wrong Reasons
What do you get when you combine a Mercedes S-Class sedan with a Chrysler PT Cruiser? No, you don't get a sleek, high-priced Euro-American hybrid vehicle. You get a car wreck, with Germans and Americans barking at each other about who's more to blame....
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Al at the Brink: On the Ropes: Gore Needs a Big Win in Court-Fast-If He's Going to Reverse His Fate and Keep the White House out of Bush's Hands
At his ranch in Crawford, Texas, George W. Bush was looking at the world beyond Inauguration Day. Dick Cheney and Colin Powell had journeyed there, wives in tow, for lunch, a strolling photo opportunity on the prairie--and a serious discussion of the...
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A Mess of a Merger: With Its Stock Value Sinking and Supershareholder Kirk Kerkorian Suing, DaimlerChrysler Is Scrambling to Make Some Badly Needed Repairs
It was supposed to be a quiet Sunday dinner between the top executive of Chrysler, Jim Holden, and his German boss, DaimlerChrysler chief Jurgen Schrempp. Sure, Chrysler was hitting some hard times, but Holden had just presented a turnaround plan to...
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Anything Jack Can Do. Can Anyone Replace a Business Legend? Ask GE's New Boss
Jack Welch wanted everything to be perfect. The celebrated chief executive has spent 20 years turning General Electric into America's most admired company, and as the clock ticked toward his retirement next year, the race to succeed him had become...
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Armaggedon, Anyone? the Veep's Running out of Time-And Options. A Guide to How Wild It Could Get before It's Over
If the polls are right, Americans are slowly beginning to tire of the lingering election mess--and Al Gore is the one they think should quit. The law may be even less patient. With a series of critical Electoral College deadlines approaching, time...
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A Supreme Moment: All Rise: When the Highest Court Met to Hear the Matter of Bush V. Gore, the Justices Peppered Both Sides with Probing Questions. Inside the Supreme Court's Dilemma
The crowd outside the Supreme Court last Friday was the perfect picture of America in the days since the election--loud, bawdy and rude. A scrappy throng of Bush and Gore supporters, kept carefully at bay by a team of uniformed officers, waved their...
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Cliffhanger: Great Action, Goofy Drama
There is one reason, and only one, for anyone to check out "Vertical Limit." The hanging-by-a-fingernail mountain-climbing sequences are spectacular. The cliffhanger is such a primal movie experience that it can turn the most sophisticated moviegoer...
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Coming to a Gym near You: Inspired by Kick Flicks like 'Charlie's Angels' and 'Crouching Tiger,' Female Moviegoers Are Riding a Wave of Kung-Fu Chic
The petite actress Zhang Ziyi in Ang Lee's new movie "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" slays several men twice her size while drinking a cup of tea. In "Charlie's Angels," Drew Barrymore manages to pulverize her captors with her feet bound to a chair....
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Cubans at the Wheel: Intrigue in Miami-Dade: Did the County's Most Volatile Political Faction Work to Intimidate Vote Counters-And Devastate Gore?
To listen to the democrats tell it, Miami-Dade Mayor Alex Penelas is the Judas of the 2000 election. Al Gore once thought so highly of Penelas that his aides leaked the name of the rising Cuban-American political star as a possible running mate. Gore...
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Curing Senioritis: For Many Students, the Last Year of High School Is Nothing More Than a Time to Coast and Hang out with Friends. Some Educators Think There's a Better Way
The first symptoms surface right about now, between Thanksgiving and Christmas: unfinished homework, a lack of interest in studying for a big test. It gets a little worse when the first early-decision college acceptances are sent out next week. But...
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Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY: Games Worth Waiting For We feel bad. it's hard to be cheerful about our roundup of the best PlayStation 2 games when so many of you are in pain, unable to find a PS2 in time for the holidays. With condolences, our top picks: SSX ($40;...
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Danger: Playing with Fire: The Craze for Candles Has Triggered a Four-Alarm Trend
By the time help arrived at Helen Carnegie's apartment in Brooklyn, it was too late. Carnegie, a 25-year-old film student at New York University, had already died from smoke inhalation in an early-morning fire. As firefighters put out the blaze in...
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Downey and out Again: After Another Arrest on Drug Charges, the Talented Actor Robert Downey Jr. Faces an Uncertain Future
Starring in a hit television show is full-time work. So is staying sober when you are a recovering addict. Over Thanksgiving weekend in a swank desert hotel, Robert Downey Jr. apparently could no longer handle both jobs at the same time. Acting on...
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Fellow Nerds: Let's Celebrate Nerdiness! Are We Friendless, Book-Smart Sissies Who Suck Up to Authority? No Way. Our Kind Has Gotten a Bad Rap
I'm a nerd. While the internet boom has lent some respectability to the term, narrow-minded and thoughtless stereotypes still linger. Nerds are supposedly friendless, book-smart sissies who suck up to authority figures. Some of our image problems stem...
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Hostage Heat: Love, Guns and Ammo
Taylor Hackford's thriller "Proof of Life" leaves a lot to be desired, but it's got its hands on a fascinating subject. Inspired by a Vanity Fair article by William Prochnau and a book by former hostage victim Thomas R. Hargrove, it gives us a peek...
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Mega Museum, Riv. Vu: The Guggenheim Plans a Gehry Complex Close to Home
President Clinton wasn't the only pol burnishing his legacy while everyone else sweated out the recounts. Last week New York's Mayor Rudolph Giuliani announced he'd back the Guggenheim Museum's plan to build a huge arts complex, designed by Frank Gehry,...
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Money Notes
SECURITY Report Cards for Stocks HOW RISKY IS THAT TECH STOCK you've been watching all week? At RiskGrades.com, every stock has a number that tells you how volatile it is and how much money it could lose for you on a bad day. Founded by statisticians...
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Money Notes
In a down market, the end of the tax year gives you a chance to profit from losses. BY LINDA STERN CHECKING ON THE STOCK market isn't as much fun as it used to be. It's ugly in there. Still, disappointed investors who make the right tax moves...
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Newsmakers
Keeping Up With Mr. Jones Wondering just what rapper Ol' Dirty Bastard is on? Well, he's not only on the charts (currently in the top five), but he's also been on the lam since escaping from a drug-rehab center back in October. Despite outstanding...
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"Nobody Was Taken for a Ride": An Interview with Jurgen Schrempp, Daimler's CEO
Jurgen Schrempp, hard-driving CEO of DaimlerChrysler, is trying to assemble the world's greatest auto company. The former engineer acknowledges he faces a "turnaround situation" at Chrysler, but is confident his newly installed management team will...
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Perspectives
"This is boring!... Now I know what people went through when... my Bronco was going up the freeway." O. J. Simpson, on the Ryder truck's being televised as it carried ballots to Tallahassee "I can't recuse myself from my constitutional duties as...
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Plotting Bush II: Shadow Cabinet: A New West Wing Cast May Hail from Texas, the Governors' Ranks-And Dad's Circle
For a couple of guys who are about the same age, George W. Bush and Andy Card don't have a whole lot in common. Card is a self-described "swamp Yankee" from Massachusetts who wouldn't know an oilfield from the surface of Mars. He isn't into baseball...
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Screen Wars: The Folks Who Gave PCs Mice and Menus Are Back with Some New Tricks
In the early 1980s, a small group in a nondescript building on Bandley Drive in Cupertino, Calif., changed your life. They did it by creating the interface for the Macintosh computer, the product that introduced the masses to hitherto obscure digital...
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Seuss on the Loose: First a Movie, Now Dr. S. Hits Broadway
A Dr. Seuss musical--why didn't someone think of that ages ago? After all, Walt Disney and Charles Schulz landed cartoons on Broadway, and cats (albeit without hats) have certainly done well. Seuss's words already sound like they're set to music, and...
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The Case in Taft's Temple: The Justices Could Spank Florida's Court. or Be Purposely Dilatory. or Let Congress Cope
In 1921, eight years after William Howard Taft escaped from the punishment--as he regarded it--of the presidency, he got what he preferred, the position of chief justice of the Supreme Court. But his contentment was incomplete. Although the judicial...
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The Gathering Tech Carnage: It's Already Depressing the Stock Market and Could Ultimately Threaten America's Boom
Even the "information economy" (a.k.a. the "New Economy") isn't immune to the law of supply and demand. One hallmark of the economic boom has been an explosion of business investment, dominated by spending for computers, software and communications...
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The Meaning of Falling: For Older People, a Major Tumble Can End Life as They Know It. for Doctors, It's a New Public-Health Issue
Ann Schneider has the spirit of a child--but a body succumbing to age. Her physical decline started 13 years ago, when she tripped and dislocated her hip. A hip replacement got Schneider, now "80-plus," back on her feet and, until last March, she was...
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The Politics of Illegitimacy: The New President Will Be Able to Govern, but He'll Inevitably Unleash Forces He Can't Control
There's an old election- night story that the political trickster Dick Tuck likes to tell. The losing candidate gets up to give his concession speech and says: "The people have spoken--the bastards!" This time the people haven't spoken, and it's the...
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The Spoils of Marriage: Divorce Is as Miserable as Ever, but More Complicated. Warring Couples Put Stock Options, Pensions and Even Frequent-Flier Miles on the Table
Marriage is about love; divorce is about money. And these days it's about a lot of money. Couples that in other eras might have fought about the house and the china now have stock options, retirement plans, time shares and even frequent-flier miles...
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The Writing on the Wall: Bitter Clashes in a Corner of Serbia Could Restart a War
The newest corner of "liberated" Serbia is a wooden shack at the junction of three dirt roads in the village of Mala Ternovac. Until last week, Serb policemen controlled this ramshackle security post, searching the vehicles of ethnic Albanians and...
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War on Two Fronts: Israeli Pols Face a Brutal Election-And a New Breed of Tough-Minded Palestinian Warlords
Bursts of automatic-rifle fire echo up the street; wisps of tear gas float in the air. An ambulance rushes toward the scene, where Israeli soldiers at a checkpoint outside the Palestinian city of Ramallah are using live ammo to force back a rock-throwing...
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We Marched to Be Counted: The War over Ballots Reminds Blacks of the Days We Didn't Have the Vote at All. If You Think It's All Technicalities, Remember Selma
People are going to die here, I remember thinking; I'm going to die here. It was Sunday, March 7, 1965--really just the day before yesterday--and Hosea Williams and I were at the head of a column of nonviolent marchers setting out from Selma to Montgomery...
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Why Gore Fights on and on And. in the Bunker: He 'Believes He Is on History's Agenda,' and His Instinct Is to Battle to the Bitter End. What Makes Al Tick
It was less than three minutes to air, and no one could find Al Gore. Everything was ready for last Monday's speech kicking off the All Al All the Time media offensive, aimed at convincing the public that the 2000 presidential election wasn't over...
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