Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 1

A Moth to the Flame: She Was an 18-Year Forest Service Veteran Who Loved Her Job. So What in the World Made Terry Barton Light the Worst Fire in Colorado History?
Byline: Dirk Johnson and Andrew Murr Terry Barton told friends she wasn't going to take it anymore. She wanted a divorce. Her estranged husband, John, was a bad drinker, a man with a mean streak and a checkered work history. She wanted him gone....
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Angela's Fire: Ten Years Ago, Angela Bassett Was Hollywood's Premier Black Actress. What Happened? the 'Sunshine State' Star Talks Frankly about Race, Sex, Age and Hollywood
Byline: Allison Samuels Angela Bassett has a flair for the dramatic. Two hours into a long, frank interview at a Beverly Hills lounge, the actress is asked why, after not starring in a movie for four years, she turned down a chance for the lead...
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Bad Boys Club: After a Wave of Scandals, Corporate America Is under Pressure to Clean Up Its Act. but Will Anything Really Change?
Byline: Allan Sloan The stock market is tanking and the business world is soured by scandal, but there is some good news. We've got a new growth industry: reforming corporate America. More than a dozen proposals from big-name sponsors--ranging from...
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Code Blue in Jerusalem: A 'White Butterfly' Is a Bad Sign, and Calm Eyes Can Mean a Victim Is 'Burning Inside.' at an Israeli Trauma Center, Doctors Have Learned Lessons They Never Could Have Imagined
Byline: Joshua Hammer The 22-year-old woman with the mane of flowing brown hair was the first victim to arrive at the hospital, and Dr. Avi Rivkind could tell within seconds that her condition was grave. Minutes earlier, a Palestinian suicide bomber...
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Credit: The Real Score
Byline: Daniel McGinn To measure intellect, Americans use IQ and SAT scores. For health, we use cholesterol tests and the body-mass index. And when it comes to finances, we're judged by our credit scores. For years consumers have been able to request...
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'Macho' or 'Sweetness'? A New Harvard Study Shows That Immigrant Boys and Girls Fare Very Differently in the outside World
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores When it comes to schooling, the Herrera boys are no match for the Herrera girls. Last week, four years after she arrived from Honduras, Martha, 20, graduated from Fairfax High School in Los Angeles. She managed decent...
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Mail Call: The Global Garage Sale: Going, Going
We heard from many eBay aficionados posting their "feedback" about our June 17 cover. "Your piece got the company and the community just right," one wrote. "Loved the story on eBay, my source for the more esoteric items I need. It truly is the world's...
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MoMA Cops Street Cred: A Move to a Stylishly Gritty Temp Home Is Recasting Its Image
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan For the architect, the terms of the job were daunting: a tiny budget, an impossibly tight deadline--and a shelf life for the finished project no longer than a car warranty. But the client was the Museum of Modern Art in...
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Murder on the Spielberg Express: A Fleet, Darkly Thrilling Jolt of Future Shock
Byline: David Ansen Steven Spielberg's "Minority Report" doesn't look or feel like anything he's done before, yet no one but Spielberg could have made it. Ferociously intense, furiously kinetic, it's expressionist film noir science fiction that,...
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Newsmakers: 1: Britney Spears's Ranking in a Forbes List of the World's Most Powerful Celebrities. Tiger Woods Is No. 2
The Foot in the Mouth of the South CNN founder Ted Turner, notorious for putting his foot in his mouth, gave a big boost to the network's archrival, the Fox News Channel, last week when he equated Israel's military activities with terrorism. His...
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Path of Most Resistance: Palestinian Fighters Say They're Ready If Israel Invades Gaza
Byline: Joshua Hammer On the outskirts of Gaza's Jabalia refugee camp, in the darkness of an Israeli-imposed blackout, a dozen masked Palestinians are waiting for trouble. One brandishes a cluster of grenades, another a rocket tube with a range...
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Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times, New York Post, New York Times, The Washington Post, New York Times, Roll Call, Reuters, New York Daily News, New York Times "I look at the sky. I look at the people." Twenty-year-old...
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Real Estate: Gimme More Shelter: What You Need to Know When Buying a Second Home
Byline: -Linda Stern Forget the floaties. This year's vacationers aren't swimming, they're shopping for property. The second-home market is as frothy as a breaking wave, stirred up by cheap mortgages, a lackluster stock market and a post-September...
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Staring across A Great Divide: The Chasm between Politicians and Assistance Recipients Seems Nearly Unbridgeable. Has Any Member of Congress Ever Lived on a Welfare Check?
Byline: Anna Quindlen In the 1970s the president of Haverford College became a totem for those who believed there was a schism between one America and another. John Coleman was a labor economist who took a sabbatical, not just to write a book but...
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The Big Secret: An Exclusive First Look at Microsoft's Ambitious-And Risky-Plan to Remake the Personal Computer to Ensure Security, Privacy and Intellectual Property Rights. Will You Buy It?
Byline: Steven Levy In ancient Troy stood the Palladium, a statue of the goddess Athena. Legend has it that the safety of the city depended on that icon's preservation. Later the term came to mean a more generic safeguard. Here's something that...
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'The Body': So September 10th: Jesse's Act Is Suddenly Very Old. We've Learned That Wrestlers Can Govern-Until Government Has to Wrestle with Something Truly Important
Byline: Jonathan Alter In early 1999 I was assigned maybe the easiest political story of the era--a profile of Gov. Jesse (The Body) Ventura. It was all color, all the time, from his feud with Garrison Keillor to his claim that St. Paul's streets...
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The Editor's Desk: This Week's Cover Story Looks at How the Martha Stewart Episode Becomes Another Chapter in the Ongoing Fall from Grace of Corporate America, While
Byline: -Mark Whitaker I like Martha Stewart. When I first became editor, I called her office to ask if she'd pose for a cover about online shopping. She called me back immediately, and was very cooperative. I've sat next to her at dinner parties...
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The Group: A New Generation of Women Is Running Some of the Country's Most Important Universities
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert Princeton University's meticulously cultivated campus oozes tradition--from the annual P-rade (in which generations of alumni march around in the sacred orange and black) to the school's unofficial motto,...
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The Hijackers' Presence Still Haunts Hamburg: Strained Relations between American and German Law-Enforcement and Intelligence Agencies Hamper Tracking Terrorists within the Country
Byline: Mark Hosenball Nearly a year after September 11, German authorities say that key members of the hijack team based in Hamburg seem to have lived normal, secular lives--until they fell under a radical Islamist "influence" around 1998. But...
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The Insiders: The Stock Scandal Involving Martha Stewart Has Pulled Back the Curtain on a World Where the Rich Pass around Business Gossip the Way the Help Passes out Canapes
Byline: Marc Peyser It was two days after Christmas, and Martha Stewart--magazine editor, TV host, syndicated columnist and high priestess of domesticity--wanted to get away from it all. She was flying with two friends from Connecticut to Mexico's...
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The Media's Heavy Hand
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson In his classic book "Manias, Panics, and Crashes," the economic historian Charles P. Kindleberger divides all financial manias into three rough phases. In the first, people discover the world has improved in some unanticipated...
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The Politics of Greed: As the Business World Churns, the Democrats Ponder How to Make Wall Street's Moral Chaos Pay at the Polls
Byline: Howard Fineman If you are a Democrat running for president, you want an audience with the Jedi of Harlem. Gov. Howard Dean of Vermont had his recently, at Bill Clinton's spacious offices on 125th Street. Dean told him that the voters seemed...
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The Rise of the Jumbo Babies: Doctors Nationwide See More and More Infants and Toddlers Tipping the Scales
Byline: --Julie Scelfo and Margaret Williams When President George W. Bush declared last week that better health is an important goal for Americans, he made a point of targeting children and adolescents. But pediatricians say it's the diaper-clad...
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This Time, We Have A Winner: George W. Bush on the Run
Byline: -Martha Brant George W. Bush isn't known as a details guy, but when it comes to exercise he's a micromanager. For the presidential fitness challenge last weekend, Bush not only chose the course for the three-mile run at Fort McNair in Washington,...
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Voices from a Hot Zone
Byline: Lally Weymouth India and Pakistan recently scared much of the world into thinking that all-out war, perhaps with nuclear weapons, might break out between them. How close were they? How close are they still? NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth met...
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Watching for Smoke and Rooting for Rain: Night after Night, My Husband Fights the Fires That Rage around Us. I've Seen Too Much to Sleep
Byline: Melanie Boock It was 2 o'clock in the morning, and I couldn't sleep. My husband, Jeff, a Colorado firefighter, was snoring, along with the two 100-pound dogs that shared our bed. In three hours he would leave for another 24-hour shift. He...
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